Warlight: A Novel by Michael OndaatjeWarlight: A Novel by Michael Ondaatje

Warlight: A Novel

byMichael Ondaatje

Hardcover | May 8, 2018

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From the internationally acclaimed, bestselling author of The English Patient: a mesmerizing new novel that tells a dramatic story set in the decade after World War II through the lives of a small group of unexpected characters and two teenagers whose lives are indelibly shaped by their unwitting involvement.

In a narrative as beguiling and mysterious as memory itself--shadowed and luminous at once--we read the story of fourteen-year-old Nathaniel, and his older sister, Rachel. In 1945, just after World War II, they stay behind in London when their parents move to Singapore, leaving them in the care of a mysterious figure named The Moth. They suspect he might be a criminal, and they grow both more convinced and less concerned as they come to know his eccentric crew of friends: men and women joined by a shared history of unspecified service during the war, all of whom seem, in some way, determined now to protect, and educate (in rather unusual ways) Rachel and Nathaniel. But are they really what and who they claim to be? And what does it mean when the siblings' mother returns after months of silence without their father, explaining nothing, excusing nothing? A dozen years later, Nathaniel begins to uncover all that he didn't know and understand in that time, and it is this journey--through facts, recollection, and imagination--that he narrates in this masterwork from one of the great writers of our time.
MICHAEL ONDAATJE is the author of several award-winning novels, as well as a memoir, a nonfiction book on film, and several books of poetry. Among other accolades, his novel The English Patient won the Booker Prize, and Anil's Ghost won the Irish Times International Fiction Prize, the Giller prize, and the Prix Médicis. Born in Sri Lan...
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Title:Warlight: A NovelFormat:HardcoverDimensions:304 pages, 8.5 × 6 × 1.2 inPublished:May 8, 2018Publisher:McClelland & StewartLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:077107378X

ISBN - 13:9780771073786

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Reviews

Rated 2 out of 5 by from Meh Was merely mediocre for me. Story had some interesting aspects but couldn't really get invested in the characters and wasn't very captivated. I've loved his works in the past but this one was disappointing.
Date published: 2018-09-11
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Take a Pass I am a voracious reader of all genres and this book did little to capture my interest or attention. I didn't really care why Nathan and Rachel's parents left and I cared even less for the two of them. I found the characters to be one dimensional and the story to be painfully slow. It is rare for me to give up on finishing a book, but I couldn't bring myself to read on past the section break around page 100.
Date published: 2018-08-31
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Masterpiece Another great novel by this master storyteller. Could be up for multiple book awards this year.
Date published: 2018-07-20
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Interesting Michael Ondaatje's books are creative and intriguing!
Date published: 2018-07-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Really loved this book! I really enjoyed reading this book, its my first time reading a book by this author but I will check out some of his other work as well!
Date published: 2018-07-07
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Confused; good though Cant tell if i liked this book. Finished it... without much of a bang. I dont know -- probably would not reccomend but if you come across in a library; worth the take out.
Date published: 2018-07-03
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Not my favourite I was so excited to read one of my favourite authors' newest book. Have to say, it was not my favourite of all his books. Not sure why.
Date published: 2018-06-29
Rated 4 out of 5 by from lovely Engaging, inspiring and mind blowing. This story will stay with you long after you have turned the final page.
Date published: 2018-06-26
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Engaging An engaging page turner. The scenes are set in the 1940's so it's interesting to immerse oneself in the past.
Date published: 2018-06-10
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great book I have to re-read BUT a few un-needed F-words that stopped enjoyment I can read books with swear words that fit the scene or character but in the midst of otherwise an almost prose-like narrative the character describing how they F....ed was not in keeping for me with the tale or characters of 1940's. The book is otherwise a really good story so I will and am re-reading it.
Date published: 2018-05-30
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Intriguing Engaging, inspiring and mind blowing. This story will stay with you long after you have turned the final page.
Date published: 2018-05-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Filled with anticipation... I'm waiting inline patiently to read this latest...what is sure to be another work of art from Truly one of his best authors!! Michael Ondaatje is a complete genius and has written an eloquent and eventful story...that everyone should read!!!!
Date published: 2018-05-12

Read from the Book

In 1945 our parents went away and left us in the care of two men who may have been criminals. We were living on a street in London called Ruvigny Gardens, and one morning either our mother or our father suggested that after breakfast the family have a talk, and they told us that they would be leaving us and going to Singapore for a year. Not too long, they said, but it would not be a brief trip either. We would of course be well cared for in their absence. I remember our father was sitting on one of those uncomfortable iron garden chairs as he broke the news, while our mother, in a summer dress just behind his shoulder, watched how we responded. After a while she took my sister Rachel’s hand and held it against her waist, as if she could give it warmth.Neither Rachel nor I said a word. We stared at our father, who was expanding on the details of their flight on the new Avro Tudor I, a descendant of the Lancaster bomber, which could cruise at more than three hundred miles an hour. They would have to land and change planes at least twice before arriving at their destination. He explained he had been promoted to take over the Unilever office in Asia, a step up in his career. It would be good for us all. He spoke seriously and our mother turned away at some point to look at her August garden. After my father had finished talking, seeing that I was confused, she came over to me and ran her fingers like a comb through my hair.I was fourteen at the time, and Rachel nearly sixteen, and they told us we would be looked after in the holidays by a guardian, as our mother called him. They referred to him as a colleague. We had already met him—we used to call him “The Moth,” a name we had invented. Ours was a family with a habit for nicknames, which meant it was also a family of dis- guises. Rachel had already told me she suspected he worked as a criminal.The arrangement appeared strange, but life still was hap- hazard and confusing during that period after the war; so what had been suggested did not feel unusual. We accepted the decision, as children do, and The Moth, who had recently become our third-floor lodger, a humble man, large but moth-like in his shy movements, was to be the solution. Our parents must have assumed he was reliable. As to whether The Moth’s criminality was evident to them, we were not sure. I suppose there had once been an attempt to make us a tightly knit family. Now and then my father let me accompany him to the Unilever offices, which were deserted during weekends and bank holidays, and while he was busy I’d wander through what seemed an abandoned world on the twelfth floor of the building. I discovered all the office drawers were locked. There was nothing in the wastepaper baskets, no pictures on the walls, although one wall in his office held a large relief map depicting the company’s foreign locations: Mombasa, the Cocos Islands, Indonesia. And nearer to home, Trieste, Heliopolis, Benghazi, Alexandria, cities that cordoned off the Mediterranean, locations I assumed were under my father’s authority. Here was where they booked holds on the hundreds of ships that travelled back and forth to the East. The lights on the map that identified those cities and ports were unlit during the weekends, in darkness much like those far outposts.At the last moment it was decided our mother would remain behind for the final weeks of the summer to oversee the arrangements for the lodger’s care over us, and ready us for our new boarding schools. On the Saturday before he flew alone towards that distant world, I accompanied my father once more to the office near Curzon Street. He had suggested a long walk, since, he said, for the next few days his body would be humbled on a plane. So we caught a bus to the Natural His- tory Museum, then walked up through Hyde Park into May- fair. He was unusually eager and cheerful, singing the lines Homespun collars, homespun hearts, Wear to rags in foreign parts, repeating them again and again, almost jauntily, as if this was an essential rule. What did it mean? I wondered. I remember we needed several keys to get into the building where the office he worked in took up that whole top floor. I stood in front of the large map, still unlit, memorizing the cities that he would fly over during the next few nights. Even then I loved maps. He came up behind me and switched on the lights so the mountains on the relief map cast shadows, though now it was not the lights I noticed so much as the harbours lit up in pale blue, as well as the great stretches of unlit earth. It was no longer a fully revealed perspective, and I suspect that Rachel and I must have watched our parents’ marriage with a similar flawed awareness. They had rarely spoken to us about their lives. We were used to partial stories. Our father had been involved in the last stages of the earlier war, and I don’t think he felt he really belonged to us.As for their departure, it was accepted that she had to go with him: there was no way, we thought, that she could exist apart from him—she was his wife. There would be less calamity, less collapse of the family if we were left behind as opposed to her remaining in Ruvigny Gardens to look after us. And as they explained, we could not suddenly leave the schools into which we had been admitted with so much difficulty. Before his departure we all embraced our father in a huddle, The Moth having tactfully disappeared for the weekend.   So we began a new life.***The Moth, our third-floor lodger, was absent from the house most of the time, though sometimes he arrived early enough to be there for dinner. He was encouraged now to join us, and only after much waving of his arms in unconvincing protest would he sit down and eat at our table. Most evenings, however, The Moth strolled over to Bigg’s Row to buy a meal. Much of the area had been destroyed during the Blitz, and a few street barrows were temporarily installed there. We were always conscious of his tentative presence, of his alighting here and there. We were never sure if this manner of his was shyness or listlessness. That would change, of course. Sometimes from my bedroom window I’d notice him talking quietly with our mother in the dark garden, or I would find him having tea with her. Before school started she spent quite a bit of time persuading him to tutor me in mathematics, a subject I had consistently failed at school, and would in fact continue to fail again long after The Moth stopped trying to teach me. During those early days the only complexity I saw in our guardian was in the almost three-dimensional drawings he created in order to allow me to go below the surface of a geometry theorem.If the subject of the war arose, my sister and I attempted to coax a few stories from him about what he had done and where. It was a time of true and false recollections, and Rachel and I were curious. The Moth and my mother referred to people they both were familiar with from those days. It was clear she knew him before he had come to live with us, but his involvement with the war was a surprise, for The Moth was never “war-like” in demeanour. His presence in our house was usually signalled by quiet piano music coming from his radio, and his current profession appeared linked to an organization involving ledgers and salaries. Still, after a few promptings we learned that both of them had worked as “fire watchers” in what they called the Bird’s Nest, located on the roof of the Grosvenor House Hotel. We sat in our pyjamas drinking Horlicks as they reminisced. An anecdote would break the surface, then disappear. One evening, soon before we had to leave for our new schools, my mother was ironing our shirts in a corner of the living room, and The Moth was standing hesitant at the foot of the stairs, about to leave, as if only partially in our company. But then, instead of leaving, he spoke of our mother’s skill during a night drive, when she had delivered men down to the coast through the darkness of the curfew to something called “the Berkshire Unit,” when all that kept her awake “were a few squares of chocolate and cold air from the open windows.” As he continued speaking, my mother listened so carefully to what he described that she held the iron with her right hand in midair so it wouldn’t rest on and burn a collar, giving herself fully to his shadowed story.I should have known then.

Editorial Reviews

National BestsellerPraise for Michael Ondaatje’s Warlight:   “The word [warlight] aptly describes the atmosphere of this haunting, brilliant novel . . . set in Britain in the decades after WWII. . . . Mesmerizing from the first sentence, rife with poignant insights and satisfying subplots, this novel about secrets and loss may be Ondaatje's best work yet.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review)"A lyrical mystery. . . . Ondaatje’s shrewd character study plays out in a smart, sophisticated drama, one worth the long wait for fans of wartime intrigue." —Kirkus Reviews (starred review)"Warlight is Ondaatje in classic form: elegant, playful and striving to connect.” —Toronto Star “Warlight possesses many of Ondaatje’s signature strengths: indelible images and a deep exploration of memory’s mindscape.” —Quill and Quire“The poetic use of natural imagery in Warlight will keep readers ruminating on how easily the world around us adapts to human foibles. . . . Do we need to obtain answers, this novel asks, or might we learn to relish ambiguity? In a book made lush through layers of experience instead of description, the latter feels possible.” —Los Angeles Times "[Ondaatje] casts a magical spell, as he takes you into his half-lit world of war and love, death and loss, and the dark waterways of the past." —New York Review of Books"Warlight is a quiet new masterpiece from Michael Ondaatje. . . . An elegaic thriller [with] the immediate allure of a dark fairy tale. In Warlight, all is illuminated, at first dimly then starkly, but always brilliantly." —The Washington Post