Warrant and Proper Function

Paperback | May 1, 1993

byAlvin Plantinga

not yet rated|write a review
In this companion volume to Warrant: The Current Debate, Alvin Plantinga develops an original approach to the question of epistemic warrant; that is what turns true belief into knowledge. He argues that what is crucial to warrant is the proper functioning of one's cognitive faculties in theright kind of cognitive environment. Although this book is in some sense a sequel to its companion volume, the arguments do not presuppose those of the first book and it stands alone as a stimulating contribution to epistemology.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$42.16

In stock online
Ships free on orders over $25

From Our Editors

Here I must acknowledge a complication with respect to my way of thinking of warrant. I aim at something in the neighborhood of an analysis of warrant: an account or exploration of our concept of warrant, a concept nearly all of us have and regularly employ.

From the Publisher

In this companion volume to Warrant: The Current Debate, Alvin Plantinga develops an original approach to the question of epistemic warrant; that is what turns true belief into knowledge. He argues that what is crucial to warrant is the proper functioning of one's cognitive faculties in theright kind of cognitive environment. Although...

From the Jacket

Here I must acknowledge a complication with respect to my way of thinking of warrant. I aim at something in the neighborhood of an analysis of warrant: an account or exploration of our concept of warrant, a concept nearly all of us have and regularly employ.

Alvin Plantinga is at University of Notre Dame.
Format:PaperbackDimensions:256 pages, 9.25 × 6.14 × 0.75 inPublished:May 1, 1993Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195078640

ISBN - 13:9780195078640

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Warrant and Proper Function

Reviews

Extra Content

From Our Editors

Here I must acknowledge a complication with respect to my way of thinking of warrant. I aim at something in the neighborhood of an analysis of warrant: an account or exploration of our concept of warrant, a concept nearly all of us have and regularly employ.

Editorial Reviews

"The present volume and its two companions raise larger issues and promise to significantly broaden the scope and influence of this epistemological project....There is much that is provocative and of great interest in this new book from Plantinga....readers of the first two volumes will findmuch food for thought here, and will have their appetites whetted for the third, forthcoming volume of the trilogy."--Mind