Watching What We Eat: The Evolution of Television Cooking Shows by Kathleen CollinsWatching What We Eat: The Evolution of Television Cooking Shows by Kathleen Collins

Watching What We Eat: The Evolution of Television Cooking Shows

byKathleen Collins

Paperback | May 6, 2010

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Title:Watching What We Eat: The Evolution of Television Cooking ShowsFormat:PaperbackDimensions:240 pages, 8.17 × 5.17 × 0.8 inPublished:May 6, 2010Publisher:BloomsburyLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1441103198

ISBN - 13:9781441103192

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Table of Contents

Introduction Early Period (1945-1962) Chapter One: Stirrings: Radio, Home Economists and James Beard Chapter Two: La Cuisine and Canned Soup: Dione Lucas vs. Convenience Middle Period (1963-1992) Chapter Three: Julia Child and Revolution in the Kitchen Chapter Four: The Me Decade and the Galloping Gourmet Chapter Five: Cultural Capital and the Frugal Gourmet Modern Period (1993-present) Chapter Six: A Network of Its Own Chapter Seven: Good Television Chapter Eight: "Democratainment": Gender, Class and the Rachael-Martha Continuum Chapter Nine: Evolution: How Did We Get Here and What's On Next?

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Collins, a college librarian with a lifelong love of cooking shows, gives a decade-by-decade breakdown of the evolution of TV cooking as a dead-accurate social barometer. From providing helpful hints for homemakers in the 1950's, catering to the lavish lifestyles and culinary excess of the 80's and satisfying the celeb-hungry, reality-crazed audience of the new millennium, Collins examines how far cooking programs have gone to adapt their content, style and character to both suit and define various moments in the 20th century. Her thorough research is spiced with anecdotes and personal testimonials from chefs, historians and foodies about the world of TV cooking and the eccentric personalities that populate it.