`We have no king but Christ: Christian Political Thought in Greater Syria on the Eve of the Arab Conquest (c.400-585) by Philip Wood

`We have no king but Christ: Christian Political Thought in Greater Syria on the Eve of the Arab…

byPhilip Wood

Hardcover | January 2, 2011

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Drawing on little-used sources in Syriac, once the lingua franca of the Middle East, Philip Wood examines how, at the close of the Roman Empire, Christianity carried with it new foundation myths for the peoples of the Near East that transformed their self-identity and their relationships withtheir rulers. This cultural independence was followed by a more radical political philosophy that dared to criticize the emperor and laid the seeds for the blending of religious and ethnic identity that we see in the Middle East today.

About The Author

Dr. Philip Wood is British Academy Post-Doctoral Fellow at Corpus Christi College, Oxford.
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Title:`We have no king but Christ: Christian Political Thought in Greater Syria on the Eve of the Arab…Format:HardcoverDimensions:350 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.03 inPublished:January 2, 2011Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:019958849X

ISBN - 13:9780199588497

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Table of Contents

Introduction1. Classification in a Christian Empire2. Controlling the Barbarians: The First Syrian Hagiographic Collection3. Theories of Nations and the World of Late Antiquity4. Edessa and Beyond: The Reception of the Doctrina Addai in the Fifth and Sixth Centuries5. The Julian Romance6. Creating Boundaries in the Miaphysite Movement7. A Miaphysite CommonwealthConclusions