Weasel by Cynthia DefeliceWeasel by Cynthia Defelice

Weasel

byCynthia Defelice

Paperback | October 1, 1991

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The name has haunted my sleep and made my awake hours uneasy for as long as I can remember. Other children whisper that he is part man and part animal -- wild and blood-thirsty. But I know Weasel is real: a man, an Indian fighter the government sent to drive off the Indians -- to "remove them." Weasel has his own ideas about removal...

Now that the Shawnees are dead or have left, Weasel has turned on the settlers. Like his namesake, the weasel, he hunts by night and sleeps by day, and he kills not because he is hungry, but for the sport of it...I know what I have to do. Weasel is out there. He could come here and hurt us. Maybe Pa can wait for the day when we'll have the law to take care of men like Weasel. But I can't...

"Nathan Fowler, eleven, narrates a short, exciting story of his adventures in 1839 Ohio...Written in spare, vivid language, often poetic, the novel is plausible historical fiction that deals with the inhumane treatment of Native Americans from a different angle." (School Library Journal.)
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Title:WeaselFormat:PaperbackDimensions:128 pages, 7.5 × 5.12 × 0.26 inPublished:October 1, 1991Publisher:HarperCollins

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0380713586

ISBN - 13:9780380713585

Appropriate for ages: 9 - 12

Reviews

From Our Editors

In her acclaimed historical fiction for young adult readers, Cynthia DeFelice blends compelling facts with the magic of an adolescent protagonist for exciting reading that any child will enjoy. The author of The Apprenticeship of Lucas Whitaker recreates 1939 Ohio in Weasel, in which 11-year-old Nathan Fowler recounts the inhumane treatment of North American Indians from a unique perspective.

Editorial Reviews

"Nathan Fowler, eleven, narrates a short, exciting story of his adventures in 1839 Ohio...Written in spare, vivid language, often poetic, the novel is plausible historical fiction that deals with the inhumane treatment of Native Americans from a different angle." (School Library Journal.)