What a Blessing She Had Chloroform: The Medical and Social Response to the Pain of Childbirth from…

Hardcover | June 10, 1999

byDonald Caton

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This book describes in fascinating detail the history of the use of anesthesia in childbirth and in so doing offers a unique perspective on the interaction between medical science and social values. Dr. Donald Caton traces the responses of physicians and their patients to the pain of childbirth from the popularization of anesthesia to the natural childbirth movement and beyond. He finds that physicians discovered what could be done to manage pain, and patients decided what would be done.

Dr. Caton discusses how nineteenth-century physicians began to think and act like scientists; how people learned to reject the belief that pain and suffering are inevitable components of life; and how a later generation came to think that pain may have important functions for the individual and society. Finally he shows the extent to which cultural and social values have influenced "scientific" medical decisions.

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From Our Editors

Everyone knows that having kids can be painful, but what might seem more confusing is some women’s choice to not relieve that pain. Donald Caton, MD, traces this phenomenon from the first days of anaesthesia used during birthing to the present when women see pain as part of the process. What a Blessing she had Chloroform is not only a ...

From the Publisher

This book describes in fascinating detail the history of the use of anesthesia in childbirth and in so doing offers a unique perspective on the interaction between medical science and social values. Dr. Donald Caton traces the responses of physicians and their patients to the pain of childbirth from the popularization of anesthesia to ...

From the Jacket

This book describes in fascinating detail the history of the use of anesthesia in childbirth and in so doing offers a unique perspective on the interaction between medical science and social values. Dr. Donald Caton traces the responses of physicians and their patients to the pain of childbirth from the popularization of anesthesia to ...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:288 pages, 8.25 × 5.5 × 0.98 inPublished:June 10, 1999Publisher:Yale University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0300075979

ISBN - 13:9780300075977

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From Our Editors

Everyone knows that having kids can be painful, but what might seem more confusing is some women’s choice to not relieve that pain. Donald Caton, MD, traces this phenomenon from the first days of anaesthesia used during birthing to the present when women see pain as part of the process. What a Blessing she had Chloroform is not only a study of the power of modern medicine, but also an example of how people still have control over how medicine is used.