What Does It All Mean?: A Very Short Introduction to Philosophy by Thomas Nagel

What Does It All Mean?: A Very Short Introduction to Philosophy

byThomas Nagel

Paperback | October 1, 1987

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In this cogent and accessible introduction to philosophy, the distinguished author of Mortal Questions and The View From Nowhere sets forth the central problems of philosophical inquiry for the beginning student. Arguing that the best way to learn about philosophy is to think about itsquestions directly, Thomas Nagel considers possible solutions to nine problems--knowledge of the world beyond our minds, knowledge of other minds, the mind-body problem, free will, the basis of morality, right and wrong, the nature of death, the meaning of life, and the meaning of words. Althoughhe states his own opinions clearly, Nagel leaves these fundamental questions open, allowing students to entertain other solutions and encouraging them to think for themselves.

About The Author

Thomas Nagel is at New York University.
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Title:What Does It All Mean?: A Very Short Introduction to PhilosophyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:112 pages, 5.39 × 8.07 × 0.24 inPublished:October 1, 1987Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195052161

ISBN - 13:9780195052169

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"An outstanding introductory framework to many of the most important problems in philosophy. It is clear and simple--even my freshman can read it--yet never simplistic...Ties in well with many traditional theories."--Richard M. Wolters, Doane College