What Really Matters: Living a Moral Life amidst Uncertainty and Danger

Paperback | October 2, 2007

byArthur Kleinman

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In this moving and thought-provoking volume, Arthur Kleinman tells the unsettling stories of a handful of men and women, some of whom have lived through some of the most fundamental transitions of the turbulent twentieth century. Here we meet an American veteran of World War II, tortured by the memory of the atrocities he committed while a soldier in the Pacific. A French-American woman aiding refugees in sub-Saharan Africa, facing the utter chaos of a society where life has become meaningless. A Chinese doctor tryingto stay alive during Mao's cultural revolution, discovering that the only values that matter are those that get you beyond the next threat. These individuals found themselves caught in circumstances where those things that matter most to them--their desires, status, relationships, resources,political and religious commitments, life itself--have been challenged by the society around them. Each is caught up in existential moral experiences that define what it means to be human, with an intensity that makes their life narratives arresting. These stories reveal just how malleable moral life is, and just how central danger is to our worlds and our livelihood. Indeed, Kleinman offers in this book a groundbreaking approach to ethics, examining "who we are" through some of the most disturbing issues of our time--war, globalization,poverty, social injustice--all in the context of actual lived moral life. "A fascinating and deeply entertaining book. For me at least, the richness of the book comes mainly from the stories Dr. Kleinman tells--complicated stories that confront life's miseries and renew the cheapened word 'inspiring.'" --Tracy Kidder "In this searingly written book, Arthur Kleinman takes us deep into the contrasting worlds of genuine reality and cultural pretense which he has spent so much of his life exploring. I have rarely read such a powerful portrayal of what Kleinman wonderfully calls 'the quality of anti-heroiceverydayness.'" --Jonathan D. Spence

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In this moving and thought-provoking volume, Arthur Kleinman tells the unsettling stories of a handful of men and women, some of whom have lived through some of the most fundamental transitions of the turbulent twentieth century. Here we meet an American veteran of World War II, tortured by the memory of the atrocities he committ...

Arthur Kleinman is Esther and Sidney Rabb Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, and Professor of Medical Anthropology in Social Medicine and Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School. A renowned psychiatrist and anthropologist, he has been awarded the Boas Prize (the highest award of the American A...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:272 pages, 5.12 × 7.8 × 0.79 inPublished:October 2, 2007Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:019533132X

ISBN - 13:9780195331325

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction2. Winthrop Cohen3. Idi Bosquet-Remarque4. Yan Zhongshu5. Charles Kentworth Jamison6. Sally Williams7. Bill Burt/Simcha Adler8. W.H.R. Rivers9. EpilogueBibliographic NoteAcknowledgmentsIndex

Editorial Reviews

"Arthur Kleinman is one of the most broadly informed and wisest people in the life sciences, bridging medicine and the social sciences in a way that is extremely rare and valuable. Moreover, he is an exceptionally keen observer and writes beautifully about matters of great significance. Hisnew book, What Really Matters, is certainly timely when violence is so much in focus and yet it is a contribution of long-term significance." --David A. Hamburg, President Emeritus, Carnegie Corporation of New York