What's Important Is Feeling: Stories by Adam WilsonWhat's Important Is Feeling: Stories by Adam Wilson

What's Important Is Feeling: Stories

byAdam Wilson

Paperback | February 25, 2014

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Bankers prowl Brooklyn bars on the eve of the stock market crash. A debate over Young Elvis versus Vegas Elvis turns existential. Detoxing junkies use a live lobster to spice up their love life. Students on summer break struggle to escape the orbit of a seemingly utopic communal house.

And in the title story, selected for The Best American Short Stories, two film school buddies working on a doomed project are left sizing up their own talent, hoping to come out on top—but fearing they won't.

In What's Important Is Feeling, Adam Wilson follows the through-line of contemporary coming-of-age from the ravings of teenage lust to the staggering loneliness of proto-adulthood. He navigates the tough terrain of American life with a delicate balance of comedy and compassion, lyricism and unsparing straightforwardness. Wilson's characters wander through a purgatory of yearning, hope, and grief. No one emerges unscathed.

Adam Wilson is the author of the novelFlatscreen(Harper Perennial, 2012). His fiction has appeared in many publications includingThe Paris Review,The Best American Short Stories,Tin House,The Literary Review,The New York Tyrant,Gigantic, and many others.He is currently a regular contributor to bothBookForumandThe Paris Review Daily. Hi...
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Title:What's Important Is Feeling: StoriesFormat:PaperbackDimensions:224 pages, 8 × 5.31 × 0.5 inPublished:February 25, 2014Publisher:HarperCollinsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0062284789

ISBN - 13:9780062284785

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Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“This book is a joy ride . . . The buoyant comedy and insight of Wilson’s prose carries these stories farther and farther past taboo, into sensitive and complicated territory.”