When Did Indians Become Straight?: Kinship, the History of Sexuality, and Native Sovereignty by Mark RifkinWhen Did Indians Become Straight?: Kinship, the History of Sexuality, and Native Sovereignty by Mark Rifkin

When Did Indians Become Straight?: Kinship, the History of Sexuality, and Native Sovereignty

byMark Rifkin

Paperback | January 28, 2011

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When Did Indians Become Straight?explores the complex relationship between sexual mores and shifting forms of Native American self-representation. It offers a cultural and literary history that stretches from the early-nineteenth century to the early-twenty-first century, demonstrating howEuramerican and Native writers have drawn on discourses of sexuality in portraying Native peoples and their sovereignty.
Mark Rifkin is Assistant Professor of English at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He is the author of Manifesting America: The Imperial Construction of U.S. National Space (OUP 2009).
Title:When Did Indians Become Straight?: Kinship, the History of Sexuality, and Native SovereigntyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:416 pages, 9.25 × 6.12 × 0.68 inPublished:January 28, 2011Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199755469

ISBN - 13:9780199755462

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Table of Contents

Introduction1. Reproducing the Indian: Racial Birth and Native Geopolitics in Narrative of the Life of Mrs. Mary Jemison and Last of the Mohicans2. Adoption Nation: Catharine Maria Sedgwick, Hendrick Aupaumut, and the Boundaries of Familial Feeling3. Romancing Kinship: Indian Education, the Allotment Program, and Zitkala-4. Allotment Subjectivities and the Administration of "Culture": Ella Deloria, Pine Ridge, and the Indian Reorganization Act5. Finding "Our" History: Gender, Sexuality, and the Space of Peoplehood in Stone Butch Blues and Mohawk Trail6. Tradition and the Contemporary Queer: Sexuality, Nationality, and History in Drowning in FireWorks Cited