When Washington Was In Vogue: A Love Story by Edward WilliamsWhen Washington Was In Vogue: A Love Story by Edward Williams

When Washington Was In Vogue: A Love Story

byEdward Williams

Paperback | March 29, 2005

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Nearly lost after its anonymous publication in 1926 and only recently rediscovered, When Washington Was in Vogue is an acclaimed love story written and set during the Harlem Renaissance. When bobbed-hair flappers were in vogue and Harlem was hopping, Washington, D.C., did its share of roaring, too.

Davy Carr, a veteran of the Great War and a new arrival in the nation's capital, is welcomed into the drawing rooms of the city's Black elite. Through letters, Davy regales an old friend in Harlem with his impressions of race, politics, and the state of Black America as well as his own experiences as an old-fashioned bachelor adrift in a world of alluring modern women -- including sassy, dark-skinned Caroline.

With an introduction by Adam McKible and commentary by Emily Bernard, this novel, a timeless love story wonderfully enriched with the drama and style of one of the most hopeful moments in African American history, is as "delightful as it is significant" (Essence).

Edward Christopher Williams was born in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1871. He was schooled at Western Reserve University, where he was Phi Beta Kappa and valedictorian, and at the New York State Library School. Williams is documented as the first Black American to graduate from a library school. He was a notable scholar, a brilliant teacher, an...
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Title:When Washington Was In Vogue: A Love StoryFormat:PaperbackDimensions:320 pages, 8 × 5.31 × 0.72 inPublished:March 29, 2005Publisher:HarperCollinsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0060555467

ISBN - 13:9780060555467

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Editorial Reviews

“Fascinating and complex . . . Williams’s lively and insightful account of Davy Carr enhances the African American canon.”