Where The Dark And The Light Folks Meet: Race And The Mythology, Politics, And Business Of Jazz by Randall SandkeWhere The Dark And The Light Folks Meet: Race And The Mythology, Politics, And Business Of Jazz by Randall Sandke

Where The Dark And The Light Folks Meet: Race And The Mythology, Politics, And Business Of Jazz

byRandall Sandke

Paperback | October 1, 2014

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Sandke tackles the stubborn and controversial question of whether jazz is the product of an insulated African-American environment, shut off from the rest of society by strictures of segregation and discrimination; or whether it is more properly understood as the juncture of a wide variety of influences under the broader umbrella of American culture. This book takes the latter course and shows how the widely accepted exclusionary view has led to decades of misunderstanding surrounding the true history and nature of jazz.
Randall Sandke has been a professional jazz musician for over 30 years. He is the author of Harmony for a New Millennium: An Introduction to Metatonal Music (2002) and has contributed to The Oxford Companion To Jazz and the Annual Review of Jazz Studies (2000).
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Title:Where The Dark And The Light Folks Meet: Race And The Mythology, Politics, And Business Of JazzFormat:PaperbackDimensions:288 pages, 8.66 × 5.88 × 0.72 inPublished:October 1, 2014Publisher:Rowman & Littlefield PublishersLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1442243546

ISBN - 13:9781442243545

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Editorial Reviews

Randall Sandke's book may have a mouthful of a title, but it very succinctly describes what the book is all about. In the space of 275 pages (counting the index), Sandke essentially tells us that everything (well, very many things) we've been taught about jazz history is bunk. Of course, he states it more elegantly than that, but the overall effect is that of pure revisionism....If jazz history means anything at all to you, you MUST read this book.