Who Believes in Human Rights?: Reflections on the European Convention by Marie-Bénédicte DembourWho Believes in Human Rights?: Reflections on the European Convention by Marie-Bénédicte Dembour

Who Believes in Human Rights?: Reflections on the European Convention

byMarie-Bénédicte Dembour

Paperback | October 23, 2006

Pricing and Purchase Info

$96.12

Earn 481 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Many people believe passionately in human rights. Others - Bentham, Marx, cultural relativists and some feminists amongst them - dismiss the concept of human rights as practically and conceptually inadequate. This book reviews these classical critiques and shows how their insights are reflected in the case law of the European Court of Human Rights. At one level an original, accessible and insightful legal commentary on the European Convention, this book is also a groundbreaking work of theory which challenges human rights orthodoxy. Its novel identification of four human rights schools proposes that we alternatively conceive of these rights as given (natural school), agreed upon (deliberative school), fought for (protest school) and talked about (discourse school). Which of these concepts we adopt is determined by particular ways in which we believe, or do not believe, in human rights.
Title:Who Believes in Human Rights?: Reflections on the European ConventionFormat:PaperbackDimensions:340 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.75 inPublished:October 23, 2006Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521683076

ISBN - 13:9780521683074

Reviews

Table of Contents

Table of cases; 1. Introduction; 2. The Convention in outline; 3. The Convention in a realist light; 4. The Convention in a utilitarian light; 5. The Convention in a Marxist light; 6. The Convention in a particularist light; 7. The Convention in a feminist light; 8. The human rights creed in four schools; 9. Conclusion: In praise of human rights nihilism; Appendices; Select bibliography; Index.

Editorial Reviews

'The themes [the author] discusses so eloquently have long constituted the key sites of human rights criticism. But they are rarely treated as discursively and revealingly as here.' The Modern Law Review