Who Owns the World: The Surprising Truth About Every Piece of Land on the Planet by Kevin Cahill

Who Owns the World: The Surprising Truth About Every Piece of Land on the Planet

byKevin Cahill, Rob McMahon

Kobo ebook | January 29, 2010

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You don't have to be a student of geography or cartography to have an interest in the world around you, especially with globalization making our planet seem smaller than ever. Now you can IM someone in Alaska, purchase coffee beans from Timor-Leste, and visit Dubai. But what do we really know about these lands?

WHO OWNS THE WORLD presents the results of the first-ever landownership survey of all 197 states and 66 territories of the world, and reveals facts both startling and eye-opening. You'll learn that:
--Only 15% of the world's population lays claim to landownership, and that landownership in too few hands is probably the single greatest cause of poverty.
--Queen Elizabeth II owns 1/6 of the entire land surface on earth (nearly 3 times the size of the U.S.).
--The Lichtenstein royal family is wealthier than the Grimaldis of Monaco.
--80% of the American population is crammed in urban areas.
--The least crowded state is Alaska, with 670 acres per person. The most crowded is New Jersey, with .7 acres per person. --60% of America's population are property owners. That's behind the UK (69% homeownership).
--And much, much more!


With its relevance to contemporary issues and culture, WHO OWNS THE WORLD makes for fascinating reading. Both entertaining and educational, it provides cocktail party conversation for years to come and is guaranteed to change the way you view the U.S. and the world.
Title:Who Owns the World: The Surprising Truth About Every Piece of Land on the PlanetFormat:Kobo ebookPublished:January 29, 2010Publisher:Grand Central PublishingLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0446551392

ISBN - 13:9780446551397

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Surprising revalations I have found this a hard book to review. Its not your typical book with pages of prose that you can read along. That part of the book comprises about 60 pages. The balance is charts and table of statistics which are not meant to be read in one sitting, rather to be re-visited frequently or when you hear about a country in a book, on a show or in the news. You can pick up this book and quickly learn more about it. I have been telling my family and friends about this book over the past months and they have found the basics are rather eye opening. "Land is the single most common characteristic of wealth worldwide." According to Mr. Cahill, to own land is to be on the track toward wealth, yet 85% of the worlds population is excluded from owning land (due to lack of money). Who holds this land is what keeps it from being owned in a more balanced fashion. Queen Elizabeth is the world's largest land owner. She owns all the lands of the Commonwealth, 9,000 million acres, of which approximately 6,600 million acres have her name as sole owner This essentially means that if the Queen wants the land on which my house sits, she can take it. The Pope rules over all the land owned by the Catholic church, some 177 million acres world wide. With that much wealth, why are churches in Ontario allowed a tax free status? The balance of the book is filled with tables and sections for each country. I opened the book and looked at Pitcairn Islands in the Pacific Ocean midway between Central America and New Zealand. Population is 44 people, size is 8,772 acres which calculates to 199.4 acres per person. Approximately half the residents own land. Big in the news right now is South Africa. Population 46,430,000 people, area 301,243,520 acres which calculates to 6.5 acres per person. The country owns all the land and individuals hold land by deed registry (the government does not guarantee title). The book is filled with fascinating reading. It is one I will be keeping on hand for frequent referrals. Where many readers pick up dictionaries to look up new words, I keep my atlas at hand, I'll now be keeping Who Owns the World nearby.
Date published: 2010-06-14