Who Should We Treat?: Rights, Rationing, and Resources in the NHS

Paperback | February 23, 2005

byChristopher Newdick

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How should we allocate NHS resources between different patients and treatments? Increasingly, patients are regarded as 'consumers' of medical services, and yet demand for medical care exceeds the resources that are made available for it. How should the NHS manage the dilemmas presented byscarce resources? Who Should We Treat? examines the economic, political, and legal environment of patients' rights in the NHS.

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How should we allocate NHS resources between different patients and treatments? Increasingly, patients are regarded as 'consumers' of medical services, and yet demand for medical care exceeds the resources that are made available for it. How should the NHS manage the dilemmas presented byscarce resources? Who Should We Treat? examines ...

Christopher Newdick is a Barrister and the Reader in Health Law at the University of Reading. He is also an honorary consultant to Reading Primary Care Trust, and a member of the Berkshire Priorities Committee.
Format:PaperbackDimensions:298 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.72 inPublished:February 23, 2005Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:019926418X

ISBN - 13:9780199264186

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Table of Contents

1. Problems of Health Care Resources2. Principles of Resource Allocation3. Managing the Resource Allocation Process in the NHS4. Organization of the NHS5. Statutory Regulation of NHS Resource Allocation6. Medical Negligence7. Negligence of NHS Institutions8. Accountability and NHS Governance9. Private and Non-NHS Providers in the NHS10. Trusting the NHS

Editorial Reviews

`...richly illuminates the trade-offs among the central indcators of a cost-effective health service - access, equity, quality, choice and cost. ...written in a language that is accessible to the medical profession and to the lay public. It also has important observations for health law andethics.'The Lancet