Why People Get Lost: The Psychology and Neuroscience of Spatial Cognition by Paul A. DudchenkoWhy People Get Lost: The Psychology and Neuroscience of Spatial Cognition by Paul A. Dudchenko

Why People Get Lost: The Psychology and Neuroscience of Spatial Cognition

byPaul A. Dudchenko

Hardcover | August 5, 2010

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At some point in our lives, most of us have been lost. How does this happen? What are the limits of our ability to find our way? Do we have an innate sense of direction? 'How people get lost' reviews the psychology and neuroscience of navigation. It starts with a history of studies looking at how organisms solve mazes. It then reviews contemporary studies of spatial cognition, and the wayfinding abilities of adults and children. It then considers how specificparts of the brain provide a cognitive map and a neural compass. This book also considers the neurology of spatial disorientation, and the tendency of patients with Alzheimer's disease to lose their way.Within the book, the author proposes that we get lost because our brain's compass becomes misoriented. This book is written for anyone with an interest in navigation and the brain. It assumes no specialised knowledge of neuroscience, but covers recent advances in our understanding of how the brain represents space.
Paul A. Dudchenko is a senior lecturer at the University of Stirling (U.K.). He received his Ph.D. in psychopharmacology at The Ohio State University, and was a National Research Service Award post-doctoral researcher at Dartmouth College and Boston University.
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Title:Why People Get Lost: The Psychology and Neuroscience of Spatial CognitionFormat:HardcoverDimensions:306 pagesPublished:August 5, 2010Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199210861

ISBN - 13:9780199210862

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Table of Contents

PrefaceAcknowledgementsDedication1. On being lost2. A history of "maze" psychology3. Contemporary studies of spatial cognition4. Human navigation5. Spatial cognition in children6. The hippocampus as a cognitive map7. Place cells and brain imaging8. The neural basis for a sense of direction: head direction neurons9. Alzheimer's disease, the parietal lobe, and topographical disorientation10. Why we get lost