Wilderness: A Journal of Quiet Adventure in Alaska—Including Extensive Hitherto Unpublished Passages fro by Rockwell KentWilderness: A Journal of Quiet Adventure in Alaska—Including Extensive Hitherto Unpublished Passages fro by Rockwell Kent

Wilderness: A Journal of Quiet Adventure in Alaska—Including Extensive Hitherto Unpublished…

byRockwell KentOtherDoug Capra

Paperback | July 26, 1996

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In August 1918 Rockwell Kent and his 9-year-old son settled into a primitive cabin on an island near Seward, Alaska. Kent, who during the next three decades became America's premier graphic artist, printmaker, and illustrator, was seeking time, peace, and solitude to work on his art and strengthen ties with his son. This reissue of the journal chronicling their 7-month odyssey describes what Kent called "an adventure of the spirit." He soon discovers how deeply he is "stirred by simple happenings in a quiet world" as man and boy face both the mundane and the magnificent: satisfaction in simple chores like woodchopping or baking; the appalling gloom of long and lonely winter nights; hours of silence while each works at his drawings; crystalline moonlight glancing off a frozen lake; killer whales cavorting in their bay. Richly illustrated by Kent's drawings, the journal vividly re-creates that sense of great height and space -- both external and internal -- at the same time that it celebrates a wilderness now nearly lost to us.
ROCKWELL KENT (1872-1971) was one of America's most celebrated graphic artists. Although he is perhaps best known for his illustrations for The Complete Works of William Shakespeare and Moby Dick, his artwork appeared everywhere at the height of his career. Kent also created the "random house" that, despite revision throughout the year...
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Title:Wilderness: A Journal of Quiet Adventure in Alaska—Including Extensive Hitherto Unpublished…Format:PaperbackDimensions:237 pages, 10 × 7 × 0.65 inPublished:July 26, 1996Publisher:Wesleyan University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0819552933

ISBN - 13:9780819552938

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Table of Contents

List of Illustration
I. Foreword
II. Preface
III. Second Preface
IV. Third Preface
V. Introduction to Alaska Drawings
VI. Discovery
1. Arrival
2. Chores
3. Winter
4. Waiting
5. Excursion
6. Home
7. Christmas
8. New Year
9. Olson!
10. Twilight
11. The Mad Hermit

From Our Editors

In August 1918 Rockwell Kent and his 9-year-old son settled into a primitive cabin on an island near Seward, Alaska. Kent, who during the next three decades became America's premier graphic artist, printmaker, and illustrator, was seeking time, peace, and solitude to work on his art and strengthen his ties with his son. This reissue of the journal chronicling their 7-month odyssey describes what Kent called "an adventure of the spirit". He soon discovers how deeply he is "stirred by simple happenings in a quiet world" as man and boy face both the mundane and the magnificent: satisfaction in simple chores like woodchopping or baking; the appalling gloom of long and lonely winter nights; hours of silence while each works at his drawings; crystalline moonlight glancing off a frozen lake; killer whales cavorting in their bay. Richly illustrated by Kent's drawings, the journal vividly re-creates that sense of great height and space - both external and internal - at the same time that it celebrates a wilderness now nearly lost to us.

Editorial Reviews

“Conservationists and ecologists should rejoice at the reappearance of this splendid diary telling of the winter of 1918 - 1919, during which the late Rockwell Kent and his 9-year-old son exulted in the beauties of Alaska’s remote Fox Island. Kent’s strong woodcuts and sketches perfectly complement an unaffected text that tells in an authentic and most effective way of unspoiled nature in all its glory . . . This book has considerable merit as an account of rugged life in Alaska, as a paean to the glories of nature, and as a record of Kent’s graphic work.”—Library Journal