Will Grayson, Will Grayson

Paperback | April 5, 2011

byJohn Green, David Levithan

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One cold night, in a most unlikely corner of Chicago, Will Grayson crosses paths with . . . Will Grayson. Two teens with the same name, running in two very different circles, suddenly find their lives going in new and unexpected directions, and culminating in epic turns-of-heart and the most fabulous musical ever to grace the high school stage. Told in alternating voices from two YA superstars, this collaborative novel features a double helping of the heart and humor that have won them both legions of fans.

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From the Publisher

One cold night, in a most unlikely corner of Chicago, Will Grayson crosses paths with . . . Will Grayson. Two teens with the same name, running in two very different circles, suddenly find their lives going in new and unexpected directions, and culminating in epic turns-of-heart and the most fabulous musical ever to grace the high scho...

John Green is the award-winning, #1 bestselling author of Looking for Alaska, An Abundance of Katherines, Paper Towns, Will Grayson, Will Grayson (with David Levithan), and The Fault in Our Stars. His many accolades include the Printz Medal, a Printz Honor, and the Edgar Award. He has twice been a finalist for the LA Times Book Prize. ...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:352 pages, 8.19 × 5.5 × 0.94 inPublished:April 5, 2011Publisher:Penguin Young Readers GroupLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0142418471

ISBN - 13:9780142418475

Appropriate for ages: 13 - 17

Customer Reviews of Will Grayson, Will Grayson

Reviews

Rated 3 out of 5 by from good not my favourite john green book, but still very enjoyable
Date published: 2016-12-04
Rated 3 out of 5 by from mediocre for John Green I loved all the books by Green that I've read perviously but this didn't hold up to the others. I think it was odd with 2 writers having 2 characters perspectives being told at the same time. The idea is interesting and it allows for the 2 characters to be unique but it was strange and hard to get behind at times
Date published: 2016-11-29
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great meld of two different authors I thought having two authors telling the story from two different points of view would be distracting, but it works very well. It's a well written, fun and easy read.
Date published: 2016-11-28
Rated 4 out of 5 by from #plumreview I bought this in Ontario for a simple past-time. Was in perfect condition and nothing was wrong with it. This book is worth reading.
Date published: 2016-11-27
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Loved It There were funny moments, and heart-wrenching moments... It was amazing, I loved it.
Date published: 2016-11-14
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The perfect X story I really enjoyed both story lines.
Date published: 2016-11-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from AMAZING I love this book so much, it's so wonderful and has a really cool concept. I love the characters so much! This is by far my favourite collaboration he's done.
Date published: 2016-11-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Absoluetly Amazing I got this a while back and when I read it, I fell completely in love! The way that the book switches between the perspective of the two Will Graysons' P.O.V. is so interesting, as you get ti explore what they think about life as they go on with day to day activities. Although they have the same name, they are completely different people who is so much different from each other. This book also contains very well developed supporting character, who is not just there for the sake of character developement for the protagonists but also undergoes their very own major character developements. What I love the most about the characters are that they have faults and weaknesses, and they are never afraid to show them. Overall, really great read and 11/10 worth my time.
Date published: 2016-11-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved it Oh my goodness gracious me, I loved this book. It was just a huge pick me up, and a great choice to get me out of my reading slump! I enjoyed the first 100 pages or so, but wasn't yet in love until one of the Will Graysons met Tiny. As soon as they met, I instantly fell in love with this book. Just all of a sudden, poof! Fell in love. Before everything happened and peoples started to see life in different ways, I didn't very much like gay Will Grayson. I thought he was a whiner and a huge bitch. But when the thing that happened, happened, and some gasping and angering hatred was had towards some characters who deserved it, I began to enjoy reading about bitchy Will Grayson because he seemed to have more reasons to be bitchy, and I also enjoyed that he became less bitchy. Also Tiny was fabulous. Everyone needs a Tiny in their lives. I just found that this book had so much growth, and so much self discovery. It also had a lot of smiles and reasons to be happy, and it had a musical. A fabulous musical that I now want to see in real life. I just... aaahh Fell in love. I fell in love.
Date published: 2016-01-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing I loved this book so so much. There was never a point where I wasn't interested.
Date published: 2015-11-20
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Fun read, ending not so much I loved it right up until the end, it was so out there and different it kept me interested the whole time, but the way it ended, it felt like a television show got cancelled with 2 episodes left to air in the season, I gave all John Greens other books nearly perfect scores, so i'm not sure if hes the one to blame for the ending....
Date published: 2014-07-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from loved it! The way the characters talk in this book is exactly the way i talk, funny, and sarcastic so i loved the way the book was written! The story was completely original, I've never read a book along the same lines as this one. It was well written, funny, and had an amazing story line! :)
Date published: 2014-01-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Love it! Actual rating: 4.5 It's such a fantastic book! Its funny and entertaining but real and so different! And, even though im not a fan of musicals this book happens to include one freaking awesome one, definitely the best to hit high school. Tiny Dancer should be in every school!  Will Grayson, Will Grayson is so awesome! Its riduciously awesome. A feel-good book. While i do not think it is John Green or David Levithan's best book, i still love it. The romantic elationships are intriguing and the one with the straight Will Grayson is something so common but not used in many book, so bravo to that. It is a LGTB book but its more than that. Yes, its deeo but its fun and happy and shows different sides to people and how one name cant define who you are.  Yes, some parts are a bit sappy or corny (which surprised me because both Levithan and Green arent those kinda of authors) but it doesnt take much away from the story. I do like both Will Graysons, but the first one we're introduced to, the straight one, is a bit... has a bit of an attitude. I like him A LOT and like the other characters, he grows throughout the book, but at first i couldnt get a feel for him. By the end i did but still, not completely... but at the same time, he's my favourite character in the book. There's just something about him... i don't know what i'm saying anymore, clearly. Oh well. Also, i did expect more. More closure on the first Will Grayson (the stright one) because we get alternate POVs and it ends in the other ones. So i would like a better ending for that Will Grayson. Really, there isnt much closure, which can be a bad thing, or a good thing. It could go either way. But i like it, the way it ends, the whole story. I like it a lot. Will Grayson, Will Grayson is different and out there. Its a book i love and both boys and girls could read, and a book i would like to read again. Its intense and funny and keeps readers engaged and turning the pages. While some things could be better, i do love it!! Its awesome and deep and real and has good messages and blah blah blah but beyond that, its fun and interesting and just awesome!!!
Date published: 2013-11-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved it! Wow, where to begin. I absolutely LOVED this book. Everything about it, from the plot, to the characters, to the relationships between the characters etc. It was hilarious, and I found myself laughing at so many points throughout, yet it was real and heart wrenching at certain points. The lives that the characters experience really shines a light on how teenagers live today. From the struggles of everyday life, to relationship drama, to personal achievements, all of those topics are covered within the 300 or so pages of this marvellous novel. I love the premise of this novel. Having one character meet another character who share the same name, and because of this little fact, their lives intertwine with each other's. Because of this, both Will Grayson's find themselves facing drama and obstacles that would otherwise, probably not occur if they had never met each other that one day at the porn store (haha, I love how they met there). But it's these struggles that lead them to a life of happiness at the end of the novel. No pain, no gain right? Overall, fantastic novel, LOVE the characters & LOVE John Green and David Leviathan.
Date published: 2013-07-30
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Will Grayson, Will Grayson by John Green & David Leviathan The best part about this story is the characters, especially the contrast between the two Will Graysons’ personalities. They are very different people despite having the same name. All of the characters are very realistic in how they interact with each other. Tiny Cooper was the most amusing person to read about and I liked viewing him through Will’s point of view, it took his enthusiasm to the extreme. The writing style was funny, I loved the depressed (I don’t know what else to call him lol) Will Grayson’s attitude towards life and how he bluntly swore at people. I laughed out loud more than a couple times while reading this book, and if not that little giggles to myself. Through the humour though are very common problems not only teens but probably adults face as well. The ending didn’t sugar coat everything, two people didn’t end up together in a super romantic fantasy ending. It was real. So I guess I have to give some credit to that, and to this duo of authors right here. http://johngreenbooks.com/ & http://www.davidlevithan.com/ . Ill give this one a 3 OUT OF 5. Not bad you guys, a funny story with some funny twists. Chow for now, MRR Check out my aweeeeeeeeeeesome bloghttp://insubstanial.blogspot.ca/
Date published: 2013-03-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Truly Remarkable! I was really impressed with the way the authors of Will Grayson Will Grayson didn't shy away from the truth. When a character is hurt, or depressed, you can feel it in their words. There is no sugarcoating. No matter if you've been through anything similar to the characters or not, you can relate to them because you feel what they feel. It all becomes so real. This is one of those books that I think everyone would benefit from reading. Will Grayson Will Grayson leaves it's mark, and when that last page has been flipped, everything seems somehow different. The reader grows with the character. It's truly remarkable.
Date published: 2012-11-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Touching I've only read one of John Green's book, Paper Towns, and I absolutely LOVED it. Many of his books are on my TBR, and I have one of David Levithan's books on my TBR. All in all, I had higher expectations for this book because I've seen many good reviews for Levithan's Every Day, and also many of Green's books. Will Grayson, Will Grayson totally BLEW ME AWAY. In the first chapter it starts talking about being able to pick your friends, pick your nose, but not pick your friend's nose, it just pulled me in. It was weirdly funny and I really liked it. The two Will Grayson's are completely different people that meet, and their lives are both sort of connected not only through their namesake but through Tiny Cooper. Who ironically is gigantic. The first Will Grayson is someone who believes that by shutting up and not caring, you won't get hurt by anyone. And those are the rules he lives by, because every time he breaks one of those rules, he gets hurt. The other Will Grayson suffers from depression, but unlike most, he is already used to living with it. He's also gay, but doesn't admit it because he doesn't "give a f***." What I loved was watching both Will Graysons struggle with their inner selves and pretty much adapt to change. They're so used to living by their own rules, and thinking the same things, that when change comes, or when someone comes and REALLY cares about him, they sort of push them away. At the end of the book, both Will Grayson's were, in a way, completely different than they were in the beginning. At first, I was appalled by the grammar of one of the Will Grayson's, but it wasn't so bad because I still understood everything he was saying. All his sentences were typed in lowercase letters, and I was just really surprised by that. Will Grayson, Will Grayson was hilarious but also a very serious book. John Green and David Levithan wrote a novel that a lot of teens can probably relate to. I fell in love with the characters, obviously not because they were perfect, but because they were flawed in such a way that I just.. loved them!! :D
Date published: 2012-10-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fabulous "my name may not be Will Greyson but I appreciate you Tiny!" I loved this book. I found myself connecting with both of the Will's by the end-and I utterly and totally fell in love with Tiny (unfortunately we could never work out even if he was real). The partnership of David Levithan and John Green in this novel was amazing. I would recommend this book a thousand times over-(though i would not recommend reading it in public as you will be laughing out loud) so much so that my copy is currently out on loan.
Date published: 2012-03-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Successful Collaboration Admittedly, I was first tempted to read this book through watching John Green on Youtube. However, I must admit that I was quite drawn to the voice of Levithan as well. I was worried that having two main characters of the same name would become confusing once they met, however, these authors skillfully merged the two characters. There is absolutely nothing I would change about this fantastic novel!
Date published: 2011-08-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Modern and Relevant I was really, really blown away by this book. So many kinds of love go on in this book - the love between friends, the love between child and parent, and of course, the love between lovers. The best part of this book is that you genuinely wish for each character to have a happy ending. For me, it wasn't until the end that it really hit me - the book has made me invest a lot of emotional energy into each character. Sadness, happiness, anger... you feel each emotion along with the character that's experiencing it. Another thing I admired about the book is that you get both conventional and non conventional characters, but they're written so well and they're so lively that you end up loving both. You would also think that having two authors would make the book jarring and difficult to read, but both authors end up complimenting one another very well. In summary: find a way to get your hands on this book! You won't regret it.
Date published: 2011-06-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing Basically, I loooooooooved this book!!!! I heard great things about this book when it first came out (no pun intended) but I thought the story of two guys with the same name meeting might be kinda lame. I decided to give it a shot because I haven't read much with LGBQT characters (basically just the Lord John series by Gabaldon) and while there are some sources for gay reader's advisory I like to diversify my reading. The characters are unbelievably real. There's something in the story about how we can be taken in by a fictional person, fall for someone who isn't actually there, and I feel like I have with all of these characters. Not in a romantic way, just in a I would be their best friend kind of way. Each of the characters ooze with genuine personality. I adore flawed heroes and underestimated rejects and I got my fill of both. The sarcasm, bluntness, confusion, and raw emotion that the authors throw at us is exquisite. I rarely feel this emotionally invested in a book, I laughed, I cried...it's a good thing I decided to read at home instead of at the park because I probably would have looked mentally disturbed. The language is fresh and young, completely realistic dialogue for online chat, texting and awkward conversations. This was an amazing collaboration between authors. Alternating chapters is an interesting and effective way to get two writers involved in the same story and the distinct narrators of the same name make this possible. This story deals with so many great things that it has something for everyone. A book club could discuss * Friendship * Clinical Depression * Love * Online Dating * Homosexuality * High school drama (as in plays not angst, although that too) There's swearing, talk about sexuality and talk about suicide so if you are sensitive about these things be forewarned, but I think that they add to the authentic feel and are important to getting the message across.
Date published: 2011-06-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from French the llama! This story is inconcievably awesome. Unconventional and irresistible Will Grayson, Will Grayson makes me optimistic. Heavy with characters that are hilarious, intelligent, melancholic, sweet, wonderful (and not), the story is earnest and, once you read either of the Will Grayson's first thought, you will be captivated until his last. A very lovely read and the most fun I've ever had when reading a song.
Date published: 2010-04-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Completely Awesome. There is romance and bromance in this latest book by Paper Towns author John Green and Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist co-author, David Levithan.Green and Levithan’s characters are not always easy to understand, or even likable, but are written with such sensitivity of purpose and growth, that one cannot help but join them as they figure out the nature of friendship and the reality of love. Swing sets, sidewalks and stage doors are portals to choose to love or to give up and, in the end, give back to the one person who forced them to be a participant in their own lives. I thoroughly enjoyed the awesomeness that is John Green & David Levithan. They continue to impress me with their ability to write authentic memorable teen voices that remind us of those deep important questions we used to ask ourselves, and the possibilities of finding the answers.
Date published: 2010-04-06

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Table of Contents Title PageCopyright PageDedication chapter onechapter twochapter threechapter fourchapter fivechapter sixchapter sevenchapter eightchapter ninechapter tenchapter elevenchapter twelvechapter thirteenchapter fourteenchapter fifteenchapter sixteenchapter seventeenchapter eighteenchapter ninteenchapter twenty AcknowledgementsDUTTON BOOKSA member of Penguin Books (USA) Inc. Published by the Penguin Group | Penguin Group (USA) Inc., 375 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10014, U.S.A. | Penguin Group (Canada), 90 Eglinton Avenue East, Suite 700, Toronto, Ontario M4P 2Y3, Canada (a division of Pearson Penguin Canada Inc.) | Penguin Books Ltd, 80 Strand, London WC2R 0RL, England | Penguin Ireland, 25 St Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2, Ireland (a division of Penguin Books Ltd) | Penguin Group (Australia), 250 Camberwell Road, Camberwell, Victoria 3124, Australia (a division of Pearson Australia Group Pty Ltd) | Penguin Books India Pvt Ltd, 11 Community Centre, Panchsheel Park, New Delhi - 110 017, India | Penguin Group (NZ), 67 Apollo Drive, Rosedale, North Shore 0632, New Zealand (a division of Pearson New Zealand Ltd) | Penguin Books (South Africa) (Pty) Ltd, 24 Sturdee Avenue, Rosebank, Johannesburg 2196, South Africa | Penguin Books Ltd, Registered Offices: 80 Strand, London WC2R 0RL, England This book is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places, and incidents are either the product of the authors’ imaginations or are used fictitiously, and any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, business establishments, events, or locales is entirely coincidental. Copyright © 2010 by John Green and David Levithan All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system now known or to be invented, without permission in writing from the publisher, except by a reviewer who wishes to quote brief passages in connection with a review written for inclusion in a magazine, newspaper, or broadcast. The publisher does not have any control over and does not assume any responsibility for author or third-party websites or their content. CIP Data is available. Published in the United States by Dutton Books,a member of Penguin Group (USA) Inc.345 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10014www.penguin.com/youngreaders   ISBN: 9781101222997To David Leventhal (for being so close)—DL  To Tobias Huisman—JGchapter one   When I was little, my dad used to tell me, “Will, you can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but you can’t pick your friend’s nose.” This seemed like a reasonably astute observation to me when I was eight, but it turns out to be incorrect on a few levels. To begin with, you cannot possibly pick your friends, or else I never would have ended up with Tiny Cooper.Tiny Cooper is not the world’s gayest person, and he is not the world’s largest person, but I believe he may be the world’s largest person who is really, really gay, and also the world’s gayest person who is really, really large. Tiny has been my best friend since fifth grade, except for all last semester, when he was busy discovering the sheer scope of his own gayness, and I was busy having an actual honest-to-God Group of Friends for the first time in my life, who ended up Never Talking to Me Again due to two slight transgressions:1. After some school-board member got all upset about gays in the locker room, I defended Tiny Cooper’s right to be both gigantic (and, therefore, the best member of our shitty football team’s offensive line) and gay in a letter to the school newspaper that I, stupidly, signed.2. This guy in the Group of Friends named Clint was talking about the letter at lunch, and in the process of talking about it, he called me a bitchsquealer, and I didn’t know what a bitchsquealer was, so I was like, “What do you mean?” And then he called me a bitchsquealer again, at which point I told Clint to fuck off and then took my tray and left.Which I guess means that technically I left the Group of Friends, although it felt the other way around. Honestly, none of them ever seemed to like me, but they were around, which isn’t nothing. And now they aren’t around, leaving me utterly bereft of social peers.Unless you count Tiny, that is. Which I suppose I must. Andbutso a few weeks after we get back from Christmas break our junior year, I’m sitting in my Assigned Seat in precalc when Tiny waltzes in wearing his jersey tucked into his chinos, even though football season is long over. Every day, Tiny miraculously manages to wedge himself into the chair-desk beside mine in precalc, and every day, I am amazed he can do it.So Tiny squeezes into his chair, I am duly amazed, and then he turns to me and he whispers really loudly because secretly he wants other people to hear, “I’m in love.” I roll my eyes, because he falls in love every hour on the hour with some poor new boy. They all look the same: skinny and sweaty and tan, the last an abomination, because all February tans in Chicago are fake, and boys who fake tan—I don’t care whether they’re gay—are ridiculous.“You’re so cynical,” Tiny says, waving his hand at me.“I’m not cynical, Tiny,” I answer. “I’m practical.”“You’re a robot,” he says. Tiny thinks that I am incapable of what humans call emotion because I have not cried since my seventh birthday, when I saw the movie All Dogs Go to Heaven. I suppose I should have known from the title that it wouldn’t end merrily, but in my defense, I was seven. Anyway, I haven’t cried since then. I don’t really understand the point of crying. Also, I feel that crying is almost—like, aside from deaths of relatives or whatever—totally avoidable if you follow two very simple rules: 1. Don’t care too much. 2. Shut up. Everything unfortunate that has ever happened to me has stemmed from failure to follow one of the rules.“I know love is real because I feel it,” Tiny says.Apparently, class has started without our knowing, because Mr. Applebaum, who is ostensibly teaching us precalculus but is mostly teaching me that pain and suffering must be endured stoically, says, “You feel what, Tiny?”“Love!” says Tiny. “I feel love.” And everyone turns around and either laughs or groans at Tiny, and because I’m sitting next to him and he’s my best and only friend, they’re laughing and groaning at me, too, which is precisely why I would not choose Tiny Cooper as my friend. He draws too much attention. Also, he has a pathological inability to follow either of my two rules. And so he waltzes around, caring too much and ceaselessly talking, and then he’s baffled when the world craps on him. And, of course, due to sheer proximity, this means the world craps on me, too.After class, I’m staring into my locker, wondering how I managed to leave The Scarlet Letter at home, when Tiny comes up with his Gay-Straight Alliance friends Gary (who is gay) and Jane (who may or may not be—I’ve never asked), and Tiny says to me, “Apparently, everyone thinks I professed my love for you in precalc. Me in love with Will Grayson. Isn’t that the silliest crap you ever heard?”“Great,” I say.“People are just such idiots,” Tiny says. “As if there’s something wrong with being in love.”Gary groans then. If you could pick your friends, I’d consider Gary. Tiny got close with Gary and Jane and Gary’s boyfriend, Nick, when he joined the GSA during my tenure as a member of the Group of Friends. I barely know Gary, since I’ve only been hanging around Tiny again for about two weeks, but he seems like the normalest person Tiny has ever befriended.“There’s a difference,” Gary points out, “between being in love and announcing it in precalc.” Tiny starts to talk and Gary cuts him off. “I mean, don’t get me wrong. You have every right to love Zach.”“Billy,” says Tiny.“Wait, what happened to Zach?” I ask, because I could have sworn Tiny was in love with a Zach during precalc. But forty-seven minutes have passed since his proclamation, so maybe he’s changed gears. Tiny has had about 3,900 boyfriends—half of them Internet-only.Gary, who seems as flummoxed by the emergence of Billy as I am, leans against the lockers and bangs his head softly against the steel. “Tiny, you being a makeout whore is so not good for the cause.”I look way up at Tiny and say, “Can we quell the rumors of our love? It hurts my chances with the ladies.”“Calling them ‘the ladies’ doesn’t help either,” Jane tells me.Tiny laughs. “But seriously,” I tell him, “I always catch shit about it.” Tiny looks at me seriously for once and nods a little.“Although for the record,” Gary says, “you could do worse than Will Grayson.”“And he has,” I note.Tiny spins in a balletic pirouette out into the middle of the hallway and, laughing, shouts, “Dear World, I am not hot for Will Grayson. But world, there’s something else you should know about Will Grayson.” And then he begins to sing, a Broadway baritone as big as his waist, “I can’t live without him!”People laugh and whoop and clap as Tiny continues the serenade while I walk off to English. It’s a long walk, and it only gets longer when someone stops you and asks how it feels to be sodomized by Tiny Cooper, and how you find Tiny Cooper’s “gay little pencil prick” behind his fat belly. I respond the way I always do: by looking down and walking straight and fast. I know they’re kidding. I know part of knowing someone is being mean to them or whatever. Tiny always has some brilliant thing to say back, like, “For someone who theoretically doesn’t want me, you sure spend a lot of time thinking and talking about my penis.” Maybe that works for Tiny, but it never works for me. Shutting up works. Following the rules works. So I shut up, and I don’t care, and I keep walking, and soon it’s over.The last time I said anything of note was the time I wrote the fricking letter to the editor about fricking Tiny Cooper and his fricking right to be a fricking star on our horrible football team. I don’t regret writing the letter in the least, but I regret signing it. Signing it was a clear violation of the rule about shutting up, and look where it got me: alone on a Tuesday afternoon, staring at my black Chuck Taylors. That night, not long after I order pizza for me and my parents, who are—as always—late at the hospital, Tiny Cooper calls me and, real quiet and fast, he blurts out, “Neutral Milk Hotel is supposedly playing a reunion show at the Hideout and it’s totally not advertised and no one even knows about it and holy shit, Grayson, holy shit!”“Holy shit!” I shout. One thing you can say for Tiny: whenever something awesome happens, Tiny is always the first to hear.Now, I am not generally given over to excitement, but Neutral Milk Hotel sort of changed my life. They released this absolutely fantastic album called In the Aeroplane Over the Sea in 1998 and haven’t been heard from since, purportedly because their lead singer lives in a cave in New Zealand. But anyway, he’s a genius. “When?”“Dunno. I just heard. I’m gonna call Jane, too. She likes them almost as much as you do. Okay, so now. Now. Let’s go to the Hideout now.”“I’m literally on my way,” I answer, opening the door to the garage. I call my mom from the car. I tell her Neutral Milk Hotel is playing at the Hideout and she says, “Who? What? You’re hiding out?” And then I hum a few bars of one of their songs and Mom says, “Oh, I know that song. It’s on the mix you made me,” and I say, “Right,” and she says, “Well you have to be back by eleven,” and I say, “Mom this is a historical event. History doesn’t have a curfew,” and she says, “Back by eleven,” and I say, “Fine. Jesus,” and then she has to go cut cancer out of someone.Tiny Cooper lives in a mansion with the world’s richest parents. I don’t think either of his parents have jobs, but they are so disgustingly rich that Tiny Cooper doesn’t even live in the mansion; he lives in the mansion’s coach house, all by himself. He has three bedrooms in that motherfucker and a fridge that always has beer in it and his parents never bother him, and so we can sit there all day and play video game football and drink Miller Lite, except in point of fact Tiny hates video games and I hate drinking beer, so mostly all we ever do is play darts (he has a dartboard) and listen to music and talk and study. I’ve just started to say the T in Tiny when he comes running out of his room, one black leather loafer on and the other in his hand, shouting, “Go, Grayson, go go.”And everything goes perfectly on the way there. Traffic’s not too bad on Sheridan, and I’m cornering the car like it’s the Indy 500, and we’re listening to my favorite NMH song, “Holland, 1945,” and then onto Lake Shore Drive, the waves of Lake Michigan crashing against the boulders by the Drive, the windows cracked to get the car to defrost, the dirty, bracing, cold air rushing in, and I love the way Chicago smells—Chicago is brackish lake water and soot and sweat and grease and I love it, and I love this song, and Tiny’s saying I love this song, and he’s got the visor down so he can muss up his hair a little more expertly. That gets me to thinking that Neutral Milk Hotel is going to see me just as surely as I’m going to see them, so I give myself a once-over in the rearview. My face seems too square and my eyes too big, like I’m perpetually surprised, but there’s nothing wrong with me that I can fix. The Hideout is a dive bar made of wooden planks that’s nestled between a factory and some Department of Transportation building. There’s nothing swank about it, but there’s a line out the door even though it’s only seven. So I huddle in line for a while with Tiny until Gary and Possibly Gay Jane show up.Jane’s wearing a hand-scrawled Neutral Milk Hotel v-neck T-shirt under her open coat. Jane showed up in Tiny’s life around the time I dropped out of it, so we don’t really know each other. Still, I’d say she’s currently about my fourth-best friend, and apparently she has good taste in music.

Editorial Reviews

A New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice An ALA Stonewall Honor Book    “Will Grayson, Will Grayson is a complete romp. [It is] so funny, rude and original that by the time flowers hit the stage, even the musical-averse will cheer.” —The New York Times Book Review   ê“Will have readers simultaneously laughing, crying and singing at the top of their lungs.”—Kirkus Reviews, starred review   “It is such a good book. [Green and Levithan] are two of the best writers writing today.” —NPR’s The Roundtable   “A brilliant novel.” —The Seattle Times   “A winning combination infused with wit, sarcasm, and plenty of musical references.” —Chicago Tribune   “A moving novel when it comes to the matters of the heart.” —The San Diego Union-Tribune   “One of the best books of the year.” —Bookpage   “A hilarious collaboration between superstar authors.” —The Daily Beast   ê“A terrific high-energy tale of teen love, lust, intrigue, anger, pain, and friendship threaded with generous measures of comedy and savvy counsel.” —Booklist, starred review   “Entertaining . . . produces all the euphoria of an actual musical; readers will be on their feet.” —The Horn Book   “Irresistibly funny, insistently wise, and filled with the honest power of friendship.” —The Wichita Eagle   “This may well be the best novel that either John Green or David Levithan has ever written. Inventive and insightful.” —Shelf Awareness   “This novel as serious buzz.´—EntertainmentWeekly.com   ê“Powerful, thought-provoking, funny, moving, and unique.” —SLJ, starred review   “Original idea, well-written, humorous, touching . . . a great read.” —Outsmart