William Cobbett: The Politics Of Style by Leonora NattrassWilliam Cobbett: The Politics Of Style by Leonora Nattrass

William Cobbett: The Politics Of Style

byLeonora Nattrass

Paperback | February 12, 2007

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This book offers the first thoroughgoing literary analysis of William Cobbett as a writer. Leonora Nattrass explores the nature and effect of Cobbett's rhetorical strategies, through close examination of a broad selection of his polemical writings from his early American journalism onward. She examines the political implications of Cobbett's style within the broader context of eighteenth- and early-nineteenth-century political prose, and argues that his perceived ideological and stylistic flaws--inconsistency, bigotry, egoism and political nostalgia--are in fact strategies designed to appeal to a range of usually polarized reading audiences.
Title:William Cobbett: The Politics Of StyleFormat:PaperbackDimensions:264 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.59 inPublished:February 12, 2007Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:052103342X

ISBN - 13:9780521033428

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements; A chronology of Cobbett's life; Introduction: change and continuity; Part I. The Creation of Cobbett: 1. Early writings 1792-1800; 2. A version of reaction; 3. Oppositional styles 1804-1816; 4. Representing Old England; Part II. Cobbett and His Audience: 5. Dialogue and debate; 6. A radical history; 7. Tracts and teaching; 8. Constituting the nation; Notes; Bibliography; Index.

Editorial Reviews

'[This] valuable book makes it possible even for those who find Cobbett's ideas in themselves too often naive, wrongheaded, or repellent, to continue to admire his art. It also goes far to account for Cobbett's undoubtedly enormous influence in his day.' James Sambrook, Romanticism