Winchester Studies 8: Winchester Studies 8: The Winchester Mint and Coins and Related Finds from…

Hardcover | May 19, 2012

EditorMartin Biddle

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Over three and a half centuries from the 880s to 1250, moneyers working in Winchester produced at the very least 24 million silver pennies. About five and a half thousand survive in national and local museums and private collections all over the world and have been sought out, photographed(some 3200 coins in 6400 images detailing both sides), and minutely catalogued by Yvonne Harvey for this volume. During the period from late in the reign of Alfred to the time of Henry III, dies for striking the coins were produced centrally under royal authority in the most sophisticated system ofmonetary control at the time in the western world. In this first account of a major English mint to have been made in forty years, a team of leading authorities have studied and analysed the use the Winchester moneyers made of the dies, and together with the size, weight, and the surviving number of coins from each pair of dies, have produced adetailed account of the varying fortunes of the mint over this period. Their results are critical for the economic history of England and the changing status of Winchester over this long period, and provide the richest available source for the history of the name of the city and the personal namesof its citizens in the later Anglo-Saxon period.

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Over three and a half centuries from the 880s to 1250, moneyers working in Winchester produced at the very least 24 million silver pennies. About five and a half thousand survive in national and local museums and private collections all over the world and have been sought out, photographed(some 3200 coins in 6400 images detailing both ...

The general editor of the Winchester series, Martin Biddle, is an archaeologist with a particular interest in towns. He has excavated at Winchester, Repton, and St Albans, and at Qasr Ibrim in Nubia, and in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. Biddle has been the Director of the Winchester Research Unit since 1968 and is Em...

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:696 pagesPublished:May 19, 2012Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198131720

ISBN - 13:9780198131724

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Table of Contents

List of platesList of figuresList of tablesRory Naismith: List of abbreviationsRory Naismith: BibliographyPART I: The Winchester Mint1. Stewart Lyon: Minting in Winchester: an Introduction and Statistical Analysis2. Martin Allen: The Winchester Mint and Exchange, 1158-12503. Veronica Smart: The Names of the Moneyers of the Winchester Mint4. Margaret Gelling: The Place-name 'Winchester'5. Yvonne Harvey: Catalogue and Die-analysis of the Winchester Mint-signed Coins6. Rory Naismith: Indices of Moneyers, Die-links, Hoards, and Other Finds, and Lists of Collections and ProvenancesPART II: Coins and Related Finds from the Winchester Excavations of 1961-711. Christopher Blunt and Michael Dolley, revised by Martin Allen and Mark Blackburn: Anglo-Saxon and Later Coins2. Philip Mernick: Jettons and Tokens by the late S.E. Rigold, the inscriptions revised by Philip Mernick3. Tim Pestell and Adrian Marsden: Repousse Foils Imitating Arabic Coins4. Geoff Egan: Lead tokens and Related Items5. Martin Biddle: Byzantine and Eastern Finds from Winchester: Chronology, Stratification, and Social Context6. Eurydice Georganteli: Byzantine Coins7. Philip Grierson: Byzantine Seals8. Martin Henig: Byzantine Intaglio9. Tim Pestell: Papal Bullae10. Helen Mitchell Brown and Rory Naismith: Kufic Coin11. Marion Archibald and Martin Biddle: Hebrew token12. Martin Allen and Martin Biddle: A Lead Seal, Possibly of Henry I13. Martin Biddle and Birthe Kjolbye-Biddle: The Contexts of the Coins: Problems of Residuality and Dating