Windfall by Jennifer E. SmithWindfall by Jennifer E. Smith

Windfall

byJennifer E. Smith

Hardcover | May 2, 2017

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about

This romantic story of hope, chance, and change from the author of The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight is one Jenny Han says is filled with all of her "favorite things," Morgan Matson calls “something wonderful” and Stephanie Perkins says “is rich with the intensity of real love.”

Alice doesn’t believe in luck—at least, not the good kind. But she does believe in love, and for some time now, she’s been pining for her best friend, Teddy. On his eighteenth birthday—just when it seems they might be on the brink of something—she buys him a lottery ticket on a lark. To their astonishment, he wins $140 million, and in an instant, everything changes.

At first, it seems like a dream come true, especially since the two of them are no strangers to misfortune. As a kid, Alice won the worst kind of lottery possible when her parents died just over a year apart from each other. And Teddy’s father abandoned his family not long after that, leaving them to grapple with his gambling debts. Through it all, Teddy and Alice have leaned on each other. But now, as they negotiate the ripple effects of Teddy’s newfound wealth, a gulf opens between them. And soon, the money starts to feel like more of a curse than a windfall.

As they try to find their way back to each other, Alice learns more about herself than she ever could have imagined . . . and about the unexpected ways in which luck and love sometimes intersect. 

A Top Ten Summer '17 Kids Indie Next List Pick!

Praise for Windfall:

Featured in Seventeen Magazine's "What's Hot Now"

Windfall is about all of my favorite things—a girl’s first big love, her first big loss, and—her first big luck.”
—Jenny Han, New York Times bestselling author of To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before
 
Windfall is perfectly named; reading it, I felt like I had suddenly found something wonderful. It’s a story about love, and luck, and the way our lives can change in an instant. I laughed and cried and bought a lottery ticket the very next day.”
—Morgan Matson, New York Times bestselling author of The Unexpected Everything
 
Windfall is rich with the intensity of real love— in all its heartache and hope.”
—Stephanie Perkins, New York Times bestselling author of Isla and the Happily Ever After 

"If you’re looking for your next great read, then you’re in “luck!” Smith combines humor and emotion to capture these characters’ life-changing story, while teaching us all a bit about luck, love, kindness and the true meaning of home." —Justine Magazine

"Windfall is an absolutely brilliant story...you will def want to add this gem to your TBR pile."
—Susane Colasanti, bestselling author of When It Happens
Jennifer E. Smith is the author of seven novels for young adults, including The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight. She earned a master’s degree in creative writing from the University of St. Andrews in Scotland, and her work has been translated into thirty-three languages. She lives in New York City. Follow her on Twitter ...
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Title:WindfallFormat:HardcoverDimensions:432 pages, 8.5 × 5.88 × 1.34 inPublished:May 2, 2017Publisher:Random House Children's BooksLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:039955937X

ISBN - 13:9780399559372

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from A good read. Give it a try This book. Wow. Smith had everything planned out. Articulately written and every aspect was given attention. Smith returned to every point full circle, whether it was the night Leo and Sofia read Harry Potter, the wishes as 12 year olds, the ostrich, or the trip to Kenya. Her characters were authentic. I love the way Teddy was written and the way Alice's once sided love was expressed. I think everyone can relate to this book at some point or another. Also, Leo and Max's relationship makes this story inclusive and contemporary without going overboard. I love the way she ended the novel, with a glimpse into everyone's lives. If I came across this book again I would probably read it. Truly a well told story. Highly recommend.
Date published: 2017-09-04
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Disappointing I did not enjoy this book as much as I enjoyed some of the other ones by Jennifer E. Smith. It was a sweet story but I did not really enjoy it.
Date published: 2017-08-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Unique Idea! Loved! This was the perfect summer, poolside read. In all honesty, it would be a perfect read all year round but it definitely was the summer contemporary that I was wanting. I don't want to give too much away in this review because I think this is one of those books it's good to go in with little information. Why? Because I think with this one, with any information you might be able to predict the ending. This isn't necessarily a bad thing because the journey in getting to the ending was the best part. This novel wall also well rounded with the sort of emotions it brought out from the reader. It was funny at times, it was sad at times, it was easy to read at times, and it was deep at times. It had everything and I really enjoyed it because...thus is life, it has highs and lows. I also really enjoyed the uniqueness about the lottery storyline. I haven't read a novel with one before (I don't think anyway) and it was an interesting component. I know I have questioned how hard celebrities have it and how much they have to sacrifice when everyone thinks they are solely privileged. That's along this same line. It really makes you question things. Definitely a good read and I will certainly be looking for more from the author. Her writing style was delightful and the plot/characters she wrote was the cherry on top
Date published: 2017-08-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Beautiful This was an amazing book. I've only read one of her other stories (Geography of You and Me) and immediately fell in love so I absolutely had to read this one after all the amazing reviews. It's fantastic. The story hooked me immediately, the characters were real and the writing was oh so amazing. I also love the idea of luck and intuition and chance. Jen wrote it in such a magical way. It was emotional.
Date published: 2017-07-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from One In A Million This book’s summary in a nutshell: a) Best Friend Romance (AKA – MY ACHILLES HEEL OF ALL CONTEMPORARY PLOTS) b) WINNING OVER A HUNDRED MILLION DOLLARS IN THE LOTTERY. c) Lives have been changed forever The minute I read Windfall’s summary, I knew I WANTED IT. Which is why, after having binge read this book in 1.5 days, I’m sitting on my bed, typing out this review, slightly in love I’m unable to open another one because IT WAS JUST THAT GOOD. My Thoughts: 1. Like I said, I love the idea behind this book. Who doesn’t win the lottery with the hope that they will WIN ALL THAT MONEY and live the life they’ve always dreamed of? Almost NOBODY. Add a best friend romance in the mix and I’m SOLD. 2. One of the first things that struck me about this book after I actually began reading was how grounded a character Alice was. I always like these kinds of fictional girls better and I instantly connected with her. Also, TELL ME ABOUT UNREQUIETED FEELINGS! 3. Another things I LOVED SO SO MUCH about this book was the presence of strong, sturdy parents. Alice’s aunt and uncle and such amazing people that only want the best for their son and orphan niece who they’ve taken in as their own. They were the PERFECT PARENTS AND I LOVED THAT YA is finally getting some. 4. I should mention that they Harry Potter reference almost had me in tears. SERIOUSLY. It warmed my heart and YOU NEED TO READ THIS. 5. I also loved my boys, Leo and Sawyer. I love big brothers in any kind of setting and Leo was only slightly awesome. I wish we got to see more of Max, of that Leo and Max will have a book of their own because SWOON. Sawyer was also a fun, stand-up kind of guy and I loved his humour. 6. Surprisingly, the one thing I thought I’d LOVE was the one thing I didn’t like about the book – and that was Teddy and Alice together. For starters, Teddy wasn’t my favourite person. I didn’t have a specific problem with him BUT with all the other great characters, he probably ranked last for me in this book (which is even more surprising because he’s exactly like my best friend IRL.) More than anything, I didn’t feel a spark between the two of them or anything but a forced romance. Harry Potter references guaranteed to make your eyes shed a few tear drops, the lottery, family and brilliant characters – Windfall is one amazing book you should get your hands on!
Date published: 2017-07-13
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Decent read It was an ok read. I read it quickly and enjoyed it, but it didn't really stick with me
Date published: 2017-06-29
Rated 3 out of 5 by from This was rather awesome! solid 3.5 stars. This book was a real disappointment for me. I am unsure how to explain why other than just to tell you that it felt very flat. It wasn't a gripping story, and I honestly couldn't get much out of it. I just expected more out of this story line. This was a very promising book. It had such potential to set a course really; there isn't much out there regarding lotto winning books. Honestly, I was surprised at how much I wanted to like this book, I did. I mean the concept is spot on. The execution just fell a little flat for me. Get ready for a long review. This is your basic young adult romance contemporary novel. I enjoy this genre of young adult novels, so I went in expecting to be wowed. Perhaps my expectations were too high. I have had some trouble with young adults novels, as I seem to get older. Sometimes I find myself failing to connect with the main character, or other times there is too much teen angst. In this book though, I was pleasantly surprised about how wonderful it was. Also let me just be frank and say that for me, Windfall is probably one of the more refreshing contemporaries out there.Which probably seems to contract everything I just said about the novel. Our main character Alice doesn't believe luck exists anymore, and honestly for a good reason. She has had to deal with the worst pain imaginable. The tragic and terrible death of her parents. She decides that she will get her best friend Teddy a lottery ticket. Mainly as a joke, but more so because she secretly is in love with him. Surprisingly this kid wins the lottery. Not just any lottery but a $140 million dollar lottery! Can you even imagine? Of course with new found money, comes new found problems. Their friendship will be tested in numerous ways. windfall /ˈwin(d)fôl/ noun a piece of unexpected good fortune, typically one that involves receiving a significant amount of money. What I found fascinating about this book is that despite so much romance mentioned in the synopsis and blurbs, this book contains very few romantic scenes. The themes of family, friendship, belonging, the struggle of money, and identity or much more regularly explored in this book. Another thing I found interesting was this isn't your typical two person friendship book either. This friendship is three bonds. Between Leo, Teddy, and Alice. I found this to be awesome because I believe that most people have more than on friend at a time, maybe even more than one best friend. I found the relationship and connection of them to be gripping. I have never developed such close friends, so I enjoyed this aspect. We have all sorts of words that could describe us. But we get to choose which ones are most important.” One major positive about this book is how well the author, Jennifer E. Smith, writes. She effortlessly and realistically captures what so many teens go thru, that challenging high school experience that is full of drama. The period of self-discovery and change. Also, she does this without talking much about the high school experience. She leaves the gossip, bullying, cheerleaders, and other crap out of this novel. It is oddly refreshing. She was able to make it modern and contemporary without being overly cliche “Here’s the thing you have to remember,” Leo says. “If you give a tiger a cupcake, you can’t be annoyed with him for eating it.” In spite of myself, I laugh. “Why would you give a tiger a cupcake?” “Why not?” he asks with a shrug. But the problem is this: I’m not annoyed with Teddy for eating the cupcake. I’m annoyed with myself for giving it to him in the first place. The family dynamics are beautiful and such loving examples. Every single young adult book I have read has an insane amount of horrible guardian figures. People that make you want to run away screaming. Or the parents are only around for one part of the book, and the teenager seems like an orphan throughout the rest of the novel. This is one of my biggest pet peeves in young adult literature. So I am very glad that windfall included such a great family dynamic. I also love the effort that went into such beautiful dialog. To end this super long review, I just want to point out a few more things. There was so much that I enjoyed about this little novel, I enjoyed the pace of the book. For once I felt like the timeline was very plausible. The characters were diverse, interesting, and completely developed. They also weren't static, the grew, changed. Sometimes for the best and other times for the worst. Overall this book isn't the worst and was pretty great. It is pretty far from a perfect young adult novel, but it is exciting and refreshing I will be picking up more of her books in the future. As always my views are my own and reflex my opinions, always try out a book for yourself! Disclaimer: I received this book in exchange for my honest and completely unbiased review. All thoughts are my own.
Date published: 2017-05-15
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Fun read! Windfall was a fun read! It had some heavy topics, but it never really felt weighed down to the point where it is no longer fun. Alice is a teen girl who lost both her parents at a young age. I love her - she is charmingly flawed and really sweet. Her cousin, Leo, is also really awesome. He is gay, (darn it) but I absolutely adore how chill Windfall is about it. He;s not at all the ‘gay sidekick’ that you sometimes find in YA - he’s his own, fully developed character, and, oh, he happens to be gay. No biggie. Side note: I also really really love Max :) Him and Leo’s relationship is adorable, and alsp really realistic. Teddy, on the other hand, was probably the main reason why this book isn’t five stars. I wasn’t rooting for Alice and Teddy at all - I wanted Alice to be happy, but Teddy just wasn’t the right guy. He was selfish, often acting with no thought to how he would impact Alice. He also had this thing where he kind of almost exhibits ownership over Alice at one point - when she starts flirting with Sawyer, Teddy gets clingy. This is really infuriating - dude! You’ve shown no interest in the girl romantically, the least you can do is let her live her life! I was fine with the way that things ended, but I wasn’t ecstatic, mostly because I had been pulling for Sawyer. I found Sawyer really sweet and he actually paid attention to Alice. He doesn’t press for my feelings on the subject, like Leo would. And he doesn’t try to crack a joke so that I’ll smile, like Teddy always does. He just sits there, considering this. Alice always has trouble expressing herself to Leo and Teddy, but Sawyer is just perfect *swoons* There were no real plot twists or anything in Windfall - it kind of went where one would expect it to. The pacing, however, was done rather well - over the course of six months, the characters developed in realistic ways. In a summary: Reread value: 6/10 Unique points: 6/10 - unique concept but really cliched romance Diversity: 8/10 - LGBT representation, but little to no POC Character Believability: 9/10 :)
Date published: 2017-03-20
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Fun read! Windfall was a fun read! It had some heavy topics, but it never really felt weighed down to the point where it is no longer fun. Alice is a teen girl who lost both her parents at a young age. I love her - she is charmingly flawed and really sweet. Her cousin, Leo, is also really awesome. He is gay, (darn it) but I absolutely adore how chill Windfall is about it. He;s not at all the ‘gay sidekick’ that you sometimes find in YA - he’s his own, fully developed character, and, oh, he happens to be gay. No biggie. Side note: I also really really love Max :) Him and Leo’s relationship is adorable, and alsp really realistic. Teddy, on the other hand, was probably the main reason why this book isn’t five stars. I wasn’t rooting for Alice and Teddy at all - I wanted Alice to be happy, but Teddy just wasn’t the right guy. He was selfish, often acting with no thought to how he would impact Alice. He also had this thing where he kind of almost exhibits ownership over Alice at one point - when she starts flirting with Sawyer, Teddy gets clingy. This is really infuriating - dude! You’ve shown no interest in the girl romantically, the least you can do is let her live her life! I was fine with the way that things ended, but I wasn’t ecstatic, mostly because I had been pulling for Sawyer. I found Sawyer really sweet and he actually paid attention to Alice. He doesn’t press for my feelings on the subject, like Leo would. And he doesn’t try to crack a joke so that I’ll smile, like Teddy always does. He just sits there, considering this. Alice always has trouble expressing herself to Leo and Teddy, but Sawyer is just perfect *swoons* There were no real plot twists or anything in Windfall - it kind of went where one would expect it to. The pacing, however, was done rather well - over the course of six months, the characters developed in realistic ways. In a summary: Reread value: 6/10 Unique points: 6/10 - unique concept but really cliched romance Diversity: 8/10 - LGBT representation, but little to no POC Character Believability: 9/10 :)
Date published: 2017-03-20

Read from the Book

One   When the man behind the counter asks for my lucky number, I hesitate. “You must have one,” he says, his pen hovering over the rows of bubbles on the form. “Everyone does.” But the problem is this: I don’t believe in luck. At least not the good kind. “Or it could be anything, really,” he says, leaning forward on the counter. “I just need five numbers. And here’s the trick. The big secret. You ready?” I nod, trying to look like I do this all the time, like I didn’t just turn eighteen a few weeks ago, like this isn’t my first time buying a lottery ticket. “You have to make them really, really good ones.” “Okay then,” I say with a smile, surprised to find myself playing along. I planned to let the computer decide, to put my faith in randomness. But now a number floats to the surface with such ease that I offer it up to him before thinking better of it. “How about thirty-one?” Teddy’s birthday. “Thirty-one,” the man repeats as he scratches out the corresponding bubble. “Very promising.” “And eight,” I tell him. My birthday. Behind me, there’s a line of people waiting to buy their own tickets, and I can practically feel their collective impatience. I glance up at the sign above the counter, where three numbers are glowing a bright red. “Three-eighty-two,” I say, pointing at the display. “Is that millions?” The man nods and my mouth falls open. “That’s how much you can win?” “You can’t win anything,” he points out, “unless you pick some more numbers.” “Right,” I say with a nod. “Twenty-four, then.” Teddy’s basketball number. “And eleven.” His apartment number. “And nine.” The number of years we’ve been friends. “Great,” says the man. “And the Powerball?” “What?” “You need to pick a Powerball number.” I frown at him. “You said five before.” “Yeah, five plus the Powerball.” The sign above the counter clicks forward: 383. It’s an amount nearly too big to mean anything--an impossible, improbable figure. I take a deep breath, trying to shuffle through the numbers in my head. But only one keeps appearing again and again, like some kind of awful magic trick. “Thirteen,” I say, half-expecting something to happen. In my mind the word is full of voltage, white-hot and charged. But out loud it sounds like any other, and the man only glances up at me with a doubtful look. “Really?” he asks. “But that’s unlucky.” “It’s just a number,” I say, even though I know that’s not true, even though I don’t believe it one bit. What I know is this: numbers are shifty things. They rarely tell the whole story. Still, when he hands over the slip of paper--that small square of illogical math and pure possibility--I tuck it carefully into the pocket of my coat. Just in case.   Two   Outside, Leo is waiting. It’s started to snow, the flakes heavy and wet, and they settle thickly over his dark hair and the shoulders of his jacket. “All set?” he asks, already starting to walk in the direction of the bus stop. I hurry after him, skidding a little in the fresh snow. “Do you have any idea how much this ticket could be worth?” I say, still trying to get my head around the number. Leo raises his eyebrows. “A million?” “No.” “Two?” “Three hundred and eighty-three million,” I tell him, then add, in case it isn’t entirely clear: “Dollars.” “That’s only if you win,” he says, grinning. “Most people get nothing but a piece of paper.” I feel for the ticket in my pocket. “Still,” I say, as we arrive at the three-sided shelter of the bus stop. “It’s kind of crazy, isn’t it?” We sit down on the bench, our breath making clouds that hang in the air before disappearing. The snow has a sting to it, and the wind off the lake is icy and sharp. We scoot closer together for warmth. Leo is my cousin, but really he feels more like my brother. I’ve been living with his family ever since I was nine, after my parents died a little more than a year apart. In the hazy aftermath of that horrible time, I found myself plucked out of San Francisco--the only home I’d ever known--and set down halfway across the country with my aunt and uncle in Chicago. Leo was the one to save me. When I arrived I was still reeling, stunned by the unfairness of a world that would take away my parents one at a time with such coldhearted precision. But Leo had decided it was his job to look out for me, and it was one he took seriously, even at nine. We were an odd pair. I was wispy and pale, with hair like my mother’s, so blond it took on a slightly pinkish hue in certain light. Leo, on the other hand, had inherited his liquid brown eyes and messy thatch of dark hair from his own mom. He was funny and kind and endlessly patient, whereas I was quiet and heartsick and a little withdrawn. But right from the start, we were a team: Leo and Alice. And, of course, Teddy. From the moment I arrived, the two of them--inseparable since they were little--took me under their wing, and we’ve been a trio ever since. When the bus appears, its headlights hazy in the whirling snow, we climb on. I slide into a seat beside the window, and Leo sinks down next to me with his long legs stretched into the empty aisle, a puddle already forming around his wet boots. I reach into my bag for the birthday card I bought for Teddy, then hold out a hand, and without even needing to ask, Leo passes over the heavy fountain pen he always carries with him. “So I ended up stealing your idea,” he says, pulling a pack of cigarettes from his coat pocket. He twirls them between his fingers, looking pleased with himself. “Another perk of turning eighteen. I know he doesn’t smoke, but I figure it’s still better than the IOU for a hug he gave me.” “You got a hug?” I say, looking over at him. “I got one for a free ice cream, which I somehow ended up paying for anyway.” Leo laughs. “Sounds about right.” I pin the card against the seat in front of me, trying to keep it steady against the bouncing of the bus. But as I stare at the blank interior, my heart starts to hammer in my chest. Leo notices me hesitate and shifts in his seat, angling himself toward the aisle to give me some privacy. I stare at his back for a second, wondering whether he’s just being polite or whether he’s finally guessed my secret, a thought that makes my face burn. For almost three years now, I’ve been in love with Teddy McAvoy. And though I’m painfully aware that I probably haven’t been hiding it very well, I usually choose--in the interest of self-preservation--to believe that’s not the case. The one consolation is that I’m pretty sure Teddy has no idea. There’s a lot to love about him, but his powers of observation are questionable at best. Which is a relief in this particular situation. It took me by surprise, falling in love with Teddy. For so many years, he’d been my best friend: my funny, charming, infuriating, often idiotic best friend. Then one day, everything changed. It was spring of freshman year, and we were on a hot dog crawl, of all things, a walking tour that Teddy had mapped out to hit all the best spots on the North Side. The morning had started off cool, but as the day wore on it became too warm for my sweatshirt, which I tied around my waist. It wasn’t until our fourth stop--where we sat at a picnic table, struggling to finish our hot dogs--that I realized it must have fallen off along the way. “Wasn’t it your mom’s?” Leo asked, looking stricken, and I nodded. It was just an old Stanford hoodie with holes in both cuffs. But the fact that it had belonged to my mother made it priceless. “We’ll find it,” Teddy promised as we began retracing our steps, but I wasn’t so sure, and my chest ached at the thought of losing it. By the time it started to pour we’d only made it halfway back through the day’s route, and it was quickly becoming clear that the sweatshirt was a lost cause. There was nothing to do but give up on it. But later that night my phone lit up with a text from Teddy: I’m outside. I crept downstairs in my pajamas, and when I opened the front door, he was standing there in the rain, his hair dripping and his jacket soaked, holding the wet sweatshirt under his arm like a football. I couldn’t believe he’d found it. I couldn’t believe he’d gone back for it. Before he could say anything, I threw my arms around him, hugging him tight, and as I did I felt something crackle to life inside me, like my heart was a radio that had been full of static for years, and now, all at once, it had gone suddenly clear. Maybe I’d loved him long before then. Maybe I just hadn’t realized it until I opened the door that night. Or maybe it was always meant to happen this way, with a shivering boy holding a damp sweatshirt on my front stoop, the whole thing as inevitable as day turning to night and back to day again. It hasn’t been easy, loving him; it’s like a dull throb, constant and persistent as a toothache, and there’s no real cure for it. For three years I’ve acted like his buddy. I’ve watched him fall for a string of other girls. And all this time, I’ve been too afraid to tell him the truth. I blink at the card in front of me, then jiggle the pen in my hand. Out the window the night is cloaked in white, and the bus carried us farther from the heart of the city. Something about the darkness, all those flecks of snow hurrying to meet the windshield, dizzying and surreal, makes me feel momentarily brave. I take a deep breath and write: Dear Teddy. Then, before I can second-guess myself, I keep going, my pen moving fast across the page, a quick, heedless emptying of my heart, an act so reckless, so bold, so monumentally stupid that it makes my blood pound in my ears. When I’m finished I reach for the envelope. “Don’t forget the ticket,” Leo says, and I slip it out of my pocket. It’s now bent, and one of the corners has a small tear, but I lay it flat against my leg and do my best to straighten it out. As Leo leans in to get a better look, I feel my face flush all over again. “Teddy’s birthday?” he says, peering at the numbers, his glasses fogged from the warmth of the bus. “Kind of an obvious one . . .” “It seemed appropriate for the occasion.” “Your birthday. Teddy’s basketball jersey.” He pauses. “What’s eleven?” “A prime number.” “Very funny,” he says, then his eyes flash with recognition. “Oh, right. His apartment. And nine?” “The number of years--” “That you guys have been friends, right,” he says, then turns to the final number. I watch his face as it registers--that awful, conspicuous thirteen--and he snaps his chin up, his dark eyes alert and full of concern. “It doesn’t mean anything,” I say quickly, flipping the ticket over and pressing it flat with my hand. “I had to think fast. I just . . .” “You don’t have to explain.” I shrug. “I know.” “I get it,” he says, and I know that he does. That’s the best thing about Leo. He watches me for a second longer, as if to make sure I’m really okay; then he sits back in his seat so that we’re both facing forward, our eyes straight ahead as the bus hurtles through the snow, which is thick as static against the windshield. After a moment, he reaches over and places a hand on top of mine, and I lean against him, resting my head on his shoulder, and we ride like that the rest of the way.   Three   The inside of Teddy’s apartment is warm and almost humid, the small space filled with too many bodies and too much noise. Beside the door, the old-fashioned radiator is hissing and clanging, and from the bedroom the music thumps through the walls, making Teddy’s school photos tremble in their frames. The single window by the galley kitchen is already fogged over, and someone has written TEDDY MCAVOY IS A across it, the last word rubbed out so that it’s impossible to tell just what exactly he is. I stand on my tiptoes, scanning the room. “I don’t see him,” I say, shrugging off my coat and throwing it on top of the haphazard pile that’s sprung up on the floor. Leo picks it up, knotting one of his sleeves to one of mine so that our jackets look like they’re holding hands. “I can’t believe he’s doing this,” he says. “His mom is gonna kill him.” But there’s more to it than that. There’s a reason Teddy doesn’t usually have people over, even though his mom works nights as a nurse. Their whole apartment is only two rooms--three if you count the bathroom. The kitchen is basically just a small tiled area tucked off in the corner, and Teddy has the only bedroom. His mom sleeps on the pullout couch while he’s at school, a detail that makes it glaringly obvious they don’t have the same kind of money as most of our classmates. But I’ve always loved it here. After Teddy’s dad walked out on them, they had to give up their spacious two-bedroom apartment in Lincoln Park, and this was all they could afford. Katherine McAvoy did what she could to make it feel like home, painting the main room a blue so bright it feels like being in a swimming pool, and the bathroom a cheerful pink. In Teddy’s room each wall is a different color: red, yellow, green, and blue, like the inside of a parachute. Tonight, though, it feels less cozy than crowded, and as a cluster of junior girls walk past us I hear one of them say, her voice incredulous, “It’s only a one-bedroom?” “Can you imagine?” says another, her eyes wide. “Where does his mom sleep?” “I knew he wasn’t rich, but I didn’t realize he was, like, poor.” Beside me I can feel Leo bristle. This is exactly why Teddy never has anyone but us over. And why it’s so strange to see dozens of our classmates crammed into every available inch of space tonight. On the couch, five girls are wedged together so closely it’s hard to imagine how they’ll ever get up, and the hallway that leads to Teddy’s room is clogged by the better part of the basketball team. As we stand there, one of them comes barreling past us--his cup held high, the liquid sloshing onto his shirt--shouting, “Dude! Dude! Dude!” over and over as he elbows his way toward the kitchen.

Editorial Reviews

"Smith’s dynamic characters and their complex struggles...will keep readers invested." —Publishers Weekly"Smith weaves a poignant tale of teens coping with loss and change as they balance on the verge of adulthood...Fans of Morgan Matson’s and Deb Caletti’s books will want to curl up with a box of tissues as they fall under Smith’s storytelling spell." —School Library Journal“[T]his compelling read, gracefully told, raises issues seldom explored in popular fiction. How can we rationalize life's inequalities? What do we owe, and to whom, when blessed with good fortune? Smart and entertaining, as to be expected from Smith.” —Kirkus Reviews"Smith taps into the relatable feelings of young love...she skillfully juxtaposes these romantic complications with the struggles of newfound wealth; family and friend conflicts; and each teen’s internal wrestling with the past, present, and future." —VOYA“Windfall is about all of my favorite things—a girl’s first big love, her first big loss, and—her first big luck.” —Jenny Han, New York Times bestselling author of To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before “Windfall is perfectly named; reading it, I felt like I had suddenly found something wonderful. It’s a story about love, and luck, and the way our lives can change in an instant. I laughed and cried and bought a lottery ticket the very next day.”  —Morgan Matson, New York Times bestselling author of The Unexpected Everything “Windfall is rich with the intensity of real love—in all its heartache and hope.” —Stephanie Perkins, New York Times bestselling author of Isla and the Happily Ever After"Windfall is an absolutely brilliant story...you will def want to add this gem to your TBR pile." —Susane Colasanti, bestselling author of When It HappensMore Praise for Jennifer E. Smith "Hello, Goodbye, and Everything in Between is the love story of Clare and Aidan, high school sweethearts who spend one last day together before college separates them, possibly forever. It's also the love story of good friends, of home, of what used to be and what's to come. This latest stunner from Jennifer E. Smith will linger in your aching heart. (But it's a good ache. The best kind.) It's an ache that comes from characters who are so real they breathe, and a relatable story that generates feels—lots of them—on every page." —Jennifer Niven, New York Times bestselling author of All the Bright Places   "Smith captures the romantic sparks that fly in unusual situations and the way love can build even when circumstances keep people apart. If you like your romances with a bit of European adventure, some New York glamour, and a lot of honest heart, The Geography of You and Me is for you." —E. Lockhart, New York Times bestselling author of We Were Liars   “A gorgeous, heartwarming reminder of the power of fate.” —The New York Times Book Review on The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight