With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox by Theodore LymanWith Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox by Theodore Lyman

With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox

byTheodore LymanEditorGeorge R. AgassizIntroduction byBrooks D. Simpson

Paperback | March 1, 1994

Pricing and Purchase Info

$38.95

Earn 195 plum® points

Prices and offers may vary in store

Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

The letters of Theodore Lyman, an aide-de-camp to General George Meade, offer a witty and penetrating inside view of the Civil War. Scholar and Boston Brahmin, Lyman volunteered for service following the battle at Gettysburg. From September 1863 to the end of the war, he wrote letters almost daily to his wife. Colonel Lyman’s early letters describe life in winter quarters. Those written after General Grant assumes command chronicle the Army of the Potomac’s long-awaited move against the Army of Northern Virginia. Lyman covered the field, delivering messages.

As a general’s aide, he was privy to headquarters planning, gossip, and politics. No one escaped his discerning eye—neither "the flaxen Custer" nor Abraham Lincoln, who struck him as "a highly intellectual and benevolent Satyr." After capably serving General Meade ("Old Peppery"), Lyman accompanied him to Appomattox Court House and there observed the dignified, defeated General Lee.

The introduction to this Bison Book edition is by Brooks D. Simpson, a professor of history at Arizona State University and the author of Let Us Have Peace: Ulysses S. Grant and the Politics of War and Reconstruction.
Loading
Title:With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to AppomattoxFormat:PaperbackDimensions:371 pages, 8 × 5.25 × 0.68 inPublished:March 1, 1994Publisher:UNP - Nebraska Paperback

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0803279353

ISBN - 13:9780803279353

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

From Our Editors

From the wilderness to appomattox. Theodore Lyman, was a general's aide to General George Meade, he was privy to headquarters planning, gossip, and politics. No one escaped his discerning eye.