Women in Public: Between Banners And Ballots, 1825-1880 by Mary P. RyanWomen in Public: Between Banners And Ballots, 1825-1880 by Mary P. Ryan

Women in Public: Between Banners And Ballots, 1825-1880

byMary P. Ryan

Paperback | February 1, 1992

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"Ryan's elegant essays sketch a chronology of changing gender symbology and contribute to our understanding of the cultural construction of boundaries between public and private. Historians and feminists will pursue for some time her questions about the process and consequences of excluding women from the public arena and their striving for participation in it."-Lee Chambers-Schiller, American Historical Review

"An extremely important contribution to women's history. It reminds us... that women's emergence in public life during the twentieth century continues to open up new political possibilities."-Ruth Rosen, Women's Review of Book

Title:Women in Public: Between Banners And Ballots, 1825-1880Format:PaperbackDimensions:208 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:February 1, 1992Publisher:Johns Hopkins University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0801844010

ISBN - 13:9780801844010

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From Our Editors

On May 15, 1862, U.S. General Benjamin Butler, commander of occupied New Orleans, ordered that any woman who publicly insulted Union soldiers be subject to prosecution as a prostitute. Not all nineteenth-century women, Butler learned, felt their place was in the home. As his order implies, women were governed by an unwritten code of public conduct, appeared on public streets, spoke out on public issues, and were subjects of public policy. In Women In Public noted historian Mary P. Ryan examines each of these issues as it affected women in New York, New Orleans, and San Francisco.

Editorial Reviews

Ryan's elegant essays sketch a chronology of changing gender symbology and contribute to our understanding of the cultural construction of boundaries between public and private. Historians and feminists will pursue for some time her questions about the process and consequences of excluding women from the public arena and their striving for participation in it.