Women Intellectuals, Modernism, and Difference: Transatlantic Culture, 1919-1945 by Alice GambrellWomen Intellectuals, Modernism, and Difference: Transatlantic Culture, 1919-1945 by Alice Gambrell

Women Intellectuals, Modernism, and Difference: Transatlantic Culture, 1919-1945

byAlice Gambrell

Paperback | July 13, 1997

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How do gender and race become objects of intellectual inquiry and evaluation? In this book Alice Gambrell examines the careers of a group of women intellectuals--Leonora Carrington, Ella Deloria, H.D., Zora Neale Hurston, and Frida Kahlo--whose scholarly rediscovery coincided with the rise of feminist and minority discourse studies in the academy. Gambrell offers new ways of thinking about the relationships between cultural studies, feminism and minority discourse within the ongoing reassessment of Modernism.

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Title:Women Intellectuals, Modernism, and Difference: Transatlantic Culture, 1919-1945Format:PaperbackDimensions:253 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.59 inPublished:July 13, 1997Publisher:Cambridge University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521556880

ISBN - 13:9780521556880

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Table of Contents

Preface; 1. Introduction: 'Familiar Strangeness': women intellectuals, modernism, and difference; 2. A courtesan's confession: Freda Kahlo and surrealist entrepreneurship; 3. Leonora Carrington's self-revisions; 4. Hurston among the Boasians; 5. Dreaming history: Hurston, Deloria, and insider-outsider dialogue; 6. 'Lyrical Interrogation': H. D.'s training-analysis; Conclusion; Broken form.

Editorial Reviews

"Gambrell's book is short but ambitious. There is muchto be said about these female figures and their male interlocutors; and it is a testament to the merit of Gambrell's text that one finishes it wishing for more." Barbara Will, American Literature