Women, the arts and globalization: Eccentric experience by Marsha MeskimmonWomen, the arts and globalization: Eccentric experience by Marsha Meskimmon

Women, the arts and globalization: Eccentric experience

EditorMarsha Meskimmon, Dorothy C. Rowe

Paperback | February 1, 2015

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Contemporary art is embedded within the structures that characterise globalization - from the transnational circulation of artworks as commodities to the cross-cultural exchange of images, objects and ideas - and the multiple and mobile territories described by these structures are always,already gendered. Women, the Arts and Globalization: Eccentric experience is the first anthology to address these interlinked issues, bringing transnational feminist theory and criticism together with women's art practices in a coherent and sustained discussion of the legacy and trajectory ofaesthetics, gender and identity on a global scale. The essays in Women, the Arts and Globalization demonstrate that women in the arts are rarely positioned at the centre of the art market, and the movement of women globally (as travelers or migrants, empowered artists/scholars or exiled practitioners), rarely corresponds with the dominant models ofglobal exchange. Rather, contemporary women's art practices provide a fascinating instance of women's eccentric experiences of the myriad effects of globalization. Women, the Arts and Globalization offers a multifaceted approach to this topic, from a variety of perspectives and positions; some textsargue for paradigm shifts in disciplines, fields or methodologies, others provide first-hand accounts of making art as a border-crossing activity. Some essays take a dialogic, interview form, whilst others use a micro-level mode of "close reading" to demonstrate how particular works of art canarticulate transnational and gendered aesthetics. The book is relevant to artists, art historians, feminist theorists and humanities scholars interested in the impact of globalization on culture in the broadest sense.
Marsha Meskimmon is Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art History and Theory at Loughborough University.
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Title:Women, the arts and globalization: Eccentric experienceFormat:PaperbackDimensions:320 pagesPublished:February 1, 2015Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0719096715

ISBN - 13:9780719096716

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Table of Contents

Editorial introduction: Ec/centric affinities: Locations, aesthetics, experiences –Marsha Meskimmon and Dorothy Rowe 1. Gendering the multitude: feminist politics, globalisation and art history – Angela Dimitrakaki 2. Women, art, migration and diaspora: The turn to art in the social sciences and the ‘new’ sociology of art? – Maggie O’Neill 3. Finding a different way home – Misha Myers in conversation with Tracey Warr 4. On foreign discomfort: Magdalena makeup live art event – Lena Simic 5. ‘How we live today …’ – Florence Ayisi in dialogue with Mo White 6. Here, there and in-between: South African women and the diasporic condition – Marion Arnold 7. Image-making with Jeanne Duval in mind: Photoworks by Maud Sulter, 1989-2002 – Deborah Cherry 8. Alison Lapper Pregnant: Embodied geographies, post-imperial identities and public sculpture in London’s Trafalgar Square – Rosemary Betterton 9. Diasporic unwrappings – Lubaina Himid in conversation with Jane Beckett 10. A Burd’s eye view: Paula Rego’s Abortion series – Michele Waugh 11. Testing the limits: Oreet Ashery in conversation with Dorothy Rowe Index