Women Writers and the English Nation in the 1790s: Romantic Belongings by Angela KeaneWomen Writers and the English Nation in the 1790s: Romantic Belongings by Angela Keane

Women Writers and the English Nation in the 1790s: Romantic Belongings

byAngela KeaneEditorMarilyn Butler, James Chandler

Paperback | November 10, 2005

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Angela Keane addresses the work of five women writers of the 1790s and its problematic relationship with the canon of Romantic literature. Refining arguments that women's writing has been overlooked, Keane examines the more complex underpinnings and exclusionary effects of the English national literary tradition. The book explores the negotiations of literate, middle-class women such as Hannah More, Mary Wollstonecraft, Charlotte Smith, Helen Maria Williams and Ann Radcliffe with emergent ideas of national literary representation.
Angela Keane is Lecturer in English Literature at the University of Sheffield. She is co-editor, with Avril Horner of Body Matters: Feminism, Textuality, Corporeality (1999) and the author of many articles on women and Romanticism.
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Title:Women Writers and the English Nation in the 1790s: Romantic BelongingsFormat:PaperbackDimensions:216 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.51 inPublished:November 10, 2005Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521022401

ISBN - 13:9780521022408

Reviews

Table of Contents

1. Introduction: romantic belongings; 2. Domesticating the sublime: Ann Radcliffe and Gothic dissent; 3. Forgotten sentiments: Helen Maria Williams's Letters from France; 4. Exiles and emigrés: the wanderings of Charlotte Smith; 5. Mary Wollstonecraft and the national body; 6. Patrician, populist and patriot: Hannah More's counter-revolutionary nationalism; Afterword.

Editorial Reviews

"Keane's book makes a valuable contribution to the fast-growing body of scholarship on the role of women in the formation of British nationalism. By offering us the image of the truly cosmopolitan female political theorist...Keane provides a new perspective on the increasingly important debate concerning the origins and character of the English nation." Nineteenth-Century Contexts