Words And Their Uses, Past And Present; A Study Of The English Language

Paperback | October 12, 2012

byRichard Grant White

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1872 edition. Excerpt: ...ultima ratio), language must needs be abandoned to the popular caprice of the moment, and we must admit that, in speech, whatever is, at any time, in any place, among whatever speakers, is right. The phrase presidential campaign is a blatant Americanism, and is a good example of what has been well styled " that inflamed newspaper English which some people describe as being eloquence." Is it not time that we had done with this nauseous talk about campaigns, and standard-bearers, and glorious victories, and all the bloated army-bumming bombast which is so rife for the six months preceding an election? To read almost any one of our political papers during a canvass is enough to make one sick and sorry. The calling a canvass a campaign is not defensible as a use of metaphor, because, first, no metaphor is called for, and last, this one is entirely out of keeping. We could do our political talking much better in simple English. One of the great needs of the day, in regard to language, is the purging it of the prurient and pretentious metaphors which have broken out all over it, and the getting plain people to say plain things in a plain way. An election has no manner of likeness to a campaign or a battle. It is not even a contest in which the stronger and more dexterous party is the winner: it is a mere comparison, a counting, in which the bare fact that one party is the more numerous puts it in power, if it will only come up and be-counted; to insure which, a certain time is spent by each party in belittling and reviling the candidates of its opponents, and in magnifying and lauding its own; and this is the canvass, at the likening-of which to a campaign every honest soldier might reasonably take offence. The loss of an election is sure to be...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1872 edition. Excerpt: ...ultima ratio), language must needs be abandoned to the popular caprice of the moment, and we must admit that, i...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:114 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.24 inPublished:October 12, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217909582

ISBN - 13:9780217909587

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