Words of the Uprooted: Jewish Immigrants in Early Twentieth-Century America by Robert A. RockawayWords of the Uprooted: Jewish Immigrants in Early Twentieth-Century America by Robert A. Rockaway

Words of the Uprooted: Jewish Immigrants in Early Twentieth-Century America

byRobert A. Rockaway

Paperback | June 25, 1998

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American Jewish leaders, many of German extraction, created the Industrial Removal Office (IRO) in 1901 in order to disperse unemployed Jewish immigrants from New York City to smaller Jewish communities throughout the United States. The IRO was designed to help refugees from persecution in the Pale of Russia find jobs and community support and, secondarily, to reduce the Manhattan ghettoes and minimize antisemitism. In twenty-one years, the IRO distributed seventy-nine thousand East European Jews to over fifteen hundred cities and towns, including Chino, California; Des Moines, Iowa; and Pensacola, Florida. Wherever they went, these twice-displaced immigrants wrote letters to the IRO's main office. Robert A. Rockaway has selected, and translated from Yiddish, letters that describe the immigrants' new surroundings, work conditions, and living situations, as well as letters that give voice to typical tensions between the immigrants and their benefactors. Rockaway introduces the letters with an essay on conditions in the Pale and on early American Jewish attempts to assist emigrants.
Title:Words of the Uprooted: Jewish Immigrants in Early Twentieth-Century AmericaFormat:PaperbackDimensions:256 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.28 inPublished:June 25, 1998Publisher:CORNELL UNIVERSITY PRESS

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0801485509

ISBN - 13:9780801485503

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Editorial Reviews

"Words of the Uprooted does an excellent job of introducing readers to a quite remarkable institution and to the history of immigration and social reform that the Industrial Removal Office's experience speaks to. Rockaway sets the scene and tells the extremely important story of the interaction of settled German-American Jews with their Russian and Eastern European Jewish brethren."—Thomas Dublin, author of Transforming Women's Work: New England Lives in the Industrial Revolution