"...Worry, Baby"

by Marc Spitz

Digitature | August 20, 2012 | Kobo Edition (eBook)

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Dexter and Donna's relationship has gone dull. To spice things up, they head to a trendy eatery on the Lower East Side, secure that "it's safe now." While waiting for a subway train, they witness a drug related shooting and find themselves face to face with a gravely wounded, white B-Boy named Larippo. He orders Dexter to go find help and holds Donna as collateral. Dexter heads up to Harlem to fetch Larippo's boss and a doctor while Donna shares her creative and sexual frustrations with the bleeding, sweating thug. Secrets and a lot more blood are spilled and nobody turns out to be who they seem. A gore and sex drenched black comedy about gentrification, cultural carpet bagging and the perils of forgetting that at its heart, New York City is anything but predictable.

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: August 20, 2012

Publisher: Digitature

Language: English

ISBN: 9990005661485

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Kobo eBook

"...Worry, Baby"

by Marc Spitz

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: August 20, 2012

Publisher: Digitature

Language: English

ISBN: 9990005661485

From the Publisher

Dexter and Donna's relationship has gone dull. To spice things up, they head to a trendy eatery on the Lower East Side, secure that "it's safe now." While waiting for a subway train, they witness a drug related shooting and find themselves face to face with a gravely wounded, white B-Boy named Larippo. He orders Dexter to go find help and holds Donna as collateral. Dexter heads up to Harlem to fetch Larippo's boss and a doctor while Donna shares her creative and sexual frustrations with the bleeding, sweating thug. Secrets and a lot more blood are spilled and nobody turns out to be who they seem. A gore and sex drenched black comedy about gentrification, cultural carpet bagging and the perils of forgetting that at its heart, New York City is anything but predictable.