Writers And Rebels: The Literature Of Insurgency In The Caucasus

Hardcover | September 20, 2016

byRebecca Ruth Gould

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Spanning the period between the end of the Russo-Caucasian War and the death of the first female Chechen suicide bomber, this groundbreaking book is the first to compare Georgian, Chechen, and Daghestani depictions of anticolonial insurgency. Rebecca Gould draws from previously untapped archival sources as well as from prose, poetry, and oral narratives to assess the impact of Tsarist and Soviet rule in the Islamic Caucasus. Examining literary representations of social banditry to tell the story of Russian colonialism from the vantage point of its subjects, among numerous other themes, Gould argues that the literatures of anticolonial insurgency constitute a veritable resistance—or “transgressive sanctity”—to colonialism.

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Spanning the period between the end of the Russo-Caucasian War and the death of the first female Chechen suicide bomber, this groundbreaking book is the first to compare Georgian, Chechen, and Daghestani depictions of anticolonial insurgency. Rebecca Gould draws from previously untapped archival sources as well as from prose, poetry, a...

Rebecca Gould is reader in translation studies and comparative literature at the University of Bristol. She lives in England.
Format:HardcoverDimensions:352 pages, 9.25 × 6.13 × 1.06 inPublished:September 20, 2016Publisher:Yale University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0300200641

ISBN - 13:9780300200645

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“Gould’s tour de force of the literatures of the Caucasus opens a new chapter in world literary history.  Gould uses the methods of three disciplines—literature, anthropology, and history—to shed new light on anti-colonialism under Russian rule. Makings these literatures available and accessible to a much wider community than ever before, Gould significantly extends the range of postcolonial critique. The book deserves a place on readers' shelves alongside the best works on postcolonial theory and history.”—Muzaffar Alam, University of Chicago