Writing, Gender and State in Early Modern England: Identity Formation and the Female Subject by Megan MatchinskeWriting, Gender and State in Early Modern England: Identity Formation and the Female Subject by Megan Matchinske

Writing, Gender and State in Early Modern England: Identity Formation and the Female Subject

byMegan Matchinske

Paperback | December 14, 2006

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The period from the Reformation to the English Civil War saw an evolving understanding of social identity in England. This book uses four illuminating case studies to chart a shift from mid-sixteenth-century notions of an individually generated, spiritually motivated self, to civil war perceptions of the self as a site of civil control. Each centers on the work of an early modern woman writer in the act of self-definition and authorization, illustrating the evolving relationships between public and private selves and the increasing role of gender in determining different identities for men and women.

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Title:Writing, Gender and State in Early Modern England: Identity Formation and the Female SubjectFormat:PaperbackDimensions:264 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.59 inPublished:December 14, 2006Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:052103521X

ISBN - 13:9780521035217

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Resistance, Reformation, and the remaining narratives; 2. Framing recusant identity in counter-Reformation England; 3. Legislating morality in the marriage market; 4. Gender formation in English apocalyptic writing; 5. Connections, qualifications, and agendas; Notes; Bibliography; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"Her book makes several important contribution to our dicussions of early modern English culture." Modern Philology vol98/4