Writing in Tongues: Translating Yiddish in the Twentieth Century

Paperback | November 5, 2013

byAnita Norich

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Writing in Tongues examines the complexities of translating Yiddish literature at a time when the Yiddish language is in decline. After the Holocaust, Soviet repression, and American assimilation, the survival of traditional Yiddish literature depends on translation, yet a few Yiddish classics have been translated repeatedly while many others have been ignored. Anita Norich traces historical and aesthetic shifts through versions of these canonical texts, and she argues that these works and their translations form an enlightening conversation about Jewish history and identity.

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Writing in Tongues examines the complexities of translating Yiddish literature at a time when the Yiddish language is in decline. After the Holocaust, Soviet repression, and American assimilation, the survival of traditional Yiddish literature depends on translation, yet a few Yiddish classics have been translated repeatedly while man...

Anita Norich is professor of English and Judaic studies at the University of Michigan.

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Writing in Tongues: Translating Yiddish in the Twentieth Century
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Format:PaperbackDimensions:160 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:November 5, 2013Publisher:University Of Washington PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0295992972

ISBN - 13:9780295992976

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Extra Content

Table of Contents

Preface Acknowledgments

1. Translation Theory and Practice: The Yiddish Difference

2. How Tevye Learned to Fiddle

3. Remembering Jews: Translating Yiddish after the Holocaust

4. Returning to and from the Ghetto: Yankev Glatshteyn

5. Concluding Lines and Conclusions

Appendix A / Anna Margolin’s "Maris tfile" in Yiddish and Translations

Appendix B / Twelve Translations of Yankev Glatshteyn’s "A gute nakht, velt"

Notes Bibliography Index

Editorial Reviews

Writing in Tongues examines the complexities of translating Yiddish literature at a time when the Yiddish language is in decline. After the Holocaust, Soviet repression, and American assimilation, the survival of traditional Yiddish literature depends on translation, yet a few Yiddish classics have been translated repeatedly while many others have been ignored. Anita Norich traces historical and aesthetic shifts through versions of these canonical texts, and she argues that these works and their translations form an enlightening conversation about Jewish history and identity.Norich tells a compelling, moving, and intriguing story. No one has studied translation of Yiddish works into English so systematically, meticulously, and sensitively. - Hana Wirth—Nesher, author of Call It English