Writing The Apocalypse: Historical Vision in Contemporary U.S. and Latin American Fiction by Lois Parkinson ZamoraWriting The Apocalypse: Historical Vision in Contemporary U.S. and Latin American Fiction by Lois Parkinson Zamora

Writing The Apocalypse: Historical Vision in Contemporary U.S. and Latin American Fiction

byLois Parkinson Zamora

Paperback | May 28, 1993

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This is a comparative literary study of apocalyptic themes and narrative techniques in the contemporary North and Latin American novel. Zamora explores the history of the myth of apocalypse, from the Bible to medieval and later interpretations, and relates this to the development of American apocalyptic attitudes. She demonstrates that the symbolic tensions inherent in the apocalytic myth have special meaning for postmodern writers. Zamora focuses her examination on the relationship between the temporal ends and the narrative endings in the works of six major novelists: Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Thomas Pynchon, Julio Cortazar, John Barth, Walker Percy, and Carlos Fuentes. Distinguished by its unique, cross-cultural perspective, this book addresses the question of the apocalypse as a matter of intellectual and literary history. Zamora's analysis will enlighten both scholars of North and Latin American literature and readers of contemporary fiction.
Title:Writing The Apocalypse: Historical Vision in Contemporary U.S. and Latin American FictionFormat:PaperbackDimensions:244 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.55 inPublished:May 28, 1993Publisher:Cambridge University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:052142691X

ISBN - 13:9780521426916

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements; 1. Introduction: the apocolyptic vision and fictions of historic desire; 2. Apocalypse and human time in the fiction of Gabriel Garcia Marquez; 3. Apocolypse and entropy: physics and the fiction of Thomas Pynchon; 4. Art and revolution in the fiction of Julio Cortazar; 5. The Apocalypse of Style: John Barth's Self-Consuming Fiction; 6. Apocolypse and renewal: Walker Percy and the US South; 7. Beyond apocalypse: Carlos Fuente's Terra Nostra; 8. Individual and communal conclusions; Notes; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"Writing the Apocalypse is a genuinely comparative study of the Americas and the apocalyptic aspirations introduced to the New World by European settlers... Lois Parkinson Zamora is to be commended for writing a challenging, provocative, learned study, equally relevant to North America and the Southern continent." Canadian Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Studies No. 31