Writing to Survive: How Teachers and Teens Negotiate the Effects of Abuse, Violence, and Disaster by Deborah M. AlvarezWriting to Survive: How Teachers and Teens Negotiate the Effects of Abuse, Violence, and Disaster by Deborah M. Alvarez

Writing to Survive: How Teachers and Teens Negotiate the Effects of Abuse, Violence, and Disaster

byDeborah M. Alvarez

Paperback | February 16, 2011

Pricing and Purchase Info

$52.00 online 
$54.95 list price save 5%
Earn 260 plum® points

Prices and offers may vary in store

Quantity:

Ships within 3-5 weeks

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

4
Deborah M. Alvarez began her teaching career in Kansas as secondary English language arts teacher. After receiving her doctorate from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in Composition Studies, Deborah now teaches methods and writing courses to future teachers at the University of Delaware while continuing her research in the effects o...
Loading
Title:Writing to Survive: How Teachers and Teens Negotiate the Effects of Abuse, Violence, and DisasterFormat:PaperbackDimensions:262 pages, 9.23 × 6.1 × 0.66 inPublished:February 16, 2011Publisher:R&L EducationLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1607097842

ISBN - 13:9781607097846

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Writing to Survive Chapter 2 Research Methodology for Prairie High School Chapter 3 Danielle- "I'm Safe Now." Chapter 4 Chase - "When I am Happy, I Have No Problems Thinking" Chapter 5 Diana -"Hell of a Life, Isn't It?" Chapter 6 Research Methodology in New Orleans Public High Schools Chapter 7 Lydia - "In Then I New My Friend was Dead." Chapter 8 Tyrone - "Doing Me is What I Do Best" Chapter 9 Writing Across Trauma, Tragedy and Adolescence

Editorial Reviews

Grounded in qualitative methods dominated by ethnography, case study, and poststructuralist interpretive styles, Alvarez (Univ. of Delaware) shares her research on five traumatized adolescents and their compensatory literacy strategies in their English language high school classes. Alvarez states the thesis of the book is that "the private violences and public disasters [Katrina] affect adolescents' ability to learn, and the trauma and stresses alter the ways in which adolescents construct literacy--called compensatory strategies." After a detailed description of literacy, writing, compensatory strategies, adolescent crises, social constructivism, modern brain theory, trauma, and her research design, Alvarez presents five case studies on the power of writing for adolescents traumatized by personal violence or a natural disaster. In the final chapter, Alvarez proposes a writing pedagogy, neo-expressivist, for all adolescents. The appendixes present additional details from the case studies, a class schedule, writing from three of the adolescents, a persuasive speech assessment, a hurricane information survey, and an English IV literacy portfolio project. The extensive bibliography clarifies works cited in the book.