X Marks the Spot: Women Writers Map the Empire for British Children, 1790-1895 by Megan A. NorciaX Marks the Spot: Women Writers Map the Empire for British Children, 1790-1895 by Megan A. Norcia

X Marks the Spot: Women Writers Map the Empire for British Children, 1790-1895

byMegan A. Norcia

Hardcover | April 13, 2010

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A Children’s Literature Association Book Award “Honor Book”

During the nineteenth century, geography primers shaped the worldviews of Britain’s ruling classes and laid the foundation for an increasingly globalized world. Written by middle-class women who mapped the world that they had neither funds nor freedom to traverse, the primers employed rhetorical tropes such as the Family of Man or discussions of food and customs in order to plot other cultures along an imperial hierarchy.

Cross-disciplinary in nature, X Marks the Spot is an analysis of previously unknown material that examines the interplay between gender, imperial duty, and pedagogy.

Megan A. Norcia offers an alternative map for traversing the landscape of nineteenth-century female history by reintroducing the primers into the dominant historical record. This is the first full-length study of the genre as a distinct tradition of writing produced on the fringes of professional geographic discourse before the high imperial period.
Megan A. Norcia is an assistant professor of English at SUNY Brockport.
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Title:X Marks the Spot: Women Writers Map the Empire for British Children, 1790-1895Format:HardcoverDimensions:304 pages, 9 × 6 × 1 inPublished:April 13, 2010Publisher:Ohio University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0821419072

ISBN - 13:9780821419076

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Editorial Reviews

“Norcia does not try to turn her writers into outspoken feminists; rather, she readily admits their complicity in the British imperial project and often in the perpetuation of their status as second-class citizens within the Empire. Her study is a well-researched, disciplined, and frank tracing of the primer writers’ subtle—but nonetheless marked—resistance to the imperialist narrative of masculine, British power within the very genre that sought to package it so prettily for child readers.” — Nineteenth Century Gender Studies