“The Troubled Roar of the Waters”: Vermont In Flood And Recovery, 1927-1931 by Deborah Pickman Clifford“The Troubled Roar of the Waters”: Vermont In Flood And Recovery, 1927-1931 by Deborah Pickman Clifford

“The Troubled Roar of the Waters”: Vermont In Flood And Recovery, 1927-1931

byDeborah Pickman Clifford, Nicholas R. Clifford

Hardcover | September 28, 2007

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Winner of the Richard Hathaway Award from the Vermont Historical Society (2008)

In their new book, Deborah Pickman Clifford and Nicholas R. Clifford revisit the devastating flood that wreaked unprecedented destruction on New England in November 1927. Vermont sustained the greatest damage by far, with eighty-four deaths (or three-quarters of the total casualties) and property losses totaling thirty to forty million in 1927 dollars (more than eighty-six dollars for every man, woman, and child then in the state). These losses were proportionally far higher than the corresponding ones suffered in the regions ravaged by the huge Mississippi floods earlier that year. In these pre-FEMA years and in true Green Mountain State style, Vermonters by and large had to confront the emergency on their own, and this at a time when the boom of the mid and late 1920s had largely bypassed Vermont, a rural state with little industry and a stagnant population.

Contrary to popular belief, however,Vermont did accept federal, Red Cross, and other outside assistance. “The Troubled Roar of the Waters” is the story of the flood, the formation and work of emergency relief committees, the efforts to rebuild in a harsh climate, and the ways in which the disaster fundamentally affected the state’s political and social development.

Though the 1920s traditionally have been represented primarily as a prelude to the Depression and the New Deal, new scholarship sees the nation entering a period of rapid and unnerving change in these years. Cities and suburbs mushroomed, the automobile revolutionized society, new and larger forms of business and industry flourished, and tensions mounted between new immigrants and the “old stock.” The Cliffords build on this, using public and private archival collections to inform their riveting story, fleshing out the historical record and adding key perspectives to this broader emerging debate over how the decade is viewed. For specialists and general readers alike, the authors place the story of the 1927 flood within the larger context of early twentieth-century American history, establishing the event and its aftermath as emblematic of the age.”
DEBORAH PICKMAN CLIFFORD (d. 2008) was a New England historian and the author of The Passion of Abby Hemenway (Vermont Historical Society, 2001, distributed by UPNE). NICHOLAS R. CLIFFORD has taught history at MIT, Princeton, and Middlebury and is the author of six previous books.
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Title:“The Troubled Roar of the Waters”: Vermont In Flood And Recovery, 1927-1931Format:HardcoverDimensions:258 pages, 9.48 × 6.52 × 1.09 inPublished:September 28, 2007Publisher:University of New Hampshire PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1584656549

ISBN - 13:9781584656548

Reviews

Table of Contents

Preface
List of People
Rising Waters
“Her Great Product Is Character”: Vermont in 1927
“Sympathy Flowed in from the Hills”: The Provision of Emergency Relief
“New Experiences in Disaster Relief”: Reconstruction Begins
“Squeezed Through After Many Hairbreadth Escapes”: Flood Politics in Washington and Montpelier
“Any Great Catastrophe Brings a Good Many Changes in Its Wake”: The Flood and Vermont’s Future
Conclusion: The Flood of 1927 in History and Memory
Notes
Select Bibliography
Index

Editorial Reviews

Winner of the Richard Hathaway Award from the Vermont Historical Society (2008)In their new book, Deborah Pickman Clifford and Nicholas R. Clifford revisit the devastating flood that wreaked unprecedented destruction on New England in November 1927. Vermont sustained the greatest damage by far, with eighty-four deaths (or three-quarters of the total casualties) and property losses totaling thirty to forty million in 1927 dollars (more than eighty-six dollars for every man, woman, and child then in the state). These losses were proportionally far higher than the corresponding ones suffered in the regions ravaged by the huge Mississippi floods earlier that year. In these pre-FEMA years and in true Green Mountain State style, Vermonters by and large had to confront the emergency on their own, and this at a time when the boom of the mid and late 1920s had largely bypassed Vermont, a rural state with little industry and a stagnant population. Contrary to popular belief, however,Vermont did accept federal, Red Cross, and other outside assistance. “The Troubled Roar of the Waters” is the story of the flood, the formation and work of emergency relief committees, the efforts to rebuild in a harsh climate, and the ways in which the disaster fundamentally affected the state’s political and social development. Though the 1920s traditionally have been represented primarily as a prelude to the Depression and the New Deal, new scholarship sees the nation entering a period of rapid and unnerving change in these years. Cities and suburbs mushroomed, the automobile revolutionized society, new and larger forms of business and industry flourished, and tensions mounted between new immigrants and the “old stock.” The Cliffords build on this, using public and private archival collections to inform their riveting story, fleshing out the historical record and adding key perspectives to this broader emerging debate over how the decade is viewed. For specialists and general readers alike, the authors place the story of the 1927 flood within the larger context of early twentieth-century American history, establishing the event and its aftermath as emblematic of the age.”"This is first-rate history—meticulously researched, well organized, clearly written, insightful. Deftly placing the Vermont of 1927 in both its national and its historical context, the authors ask intriguing questions of their material and provide or suggest thoughtful answers. The book's overall quality invites comparison with David McCullough's outstanding study of the Johnstown flood of 1889." - William B. Catton, Professor of History, Emeritus, Middlebury College