Xenopus Laevis: Practical Uses In Cell And Molecular Biology

Other | February 1, 1992

byKay, Brian K., Brian K. Kay

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This volume presents the first comprehensive treatment of the wide range of uses forXenopus laevisoocytes and embryos in cell and molecular biology. Each chapter includes background information, experimental protocols, and suggested applications. An extensive array of techniques is featured. The authors are experienced researchers who have written chapters that will be useful to both experienced researchers and to those new toXenopusas an experimental system. Full-color plates and diagrams enhance the educational value of this book, which provides a valuable permanent resource for all laboratories that useXenopus.

* Features approximately twenty full-color plates illustrating experimental techniques and results and depicting embryonic development
* Provides complete coverage of Xenopus laevis as an experimental system including
* Embryonic development, genetics, and laboratory care
* Up-to-date protocols for experimental techniques using oocytes and embryos
* General information listing recipes, suppliers, sequences, codons, and clones

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This volume presents the first comprehensive treatment of the wide range of uses forXenopus laevisoocytes and embryos in cell and molecular biology. Each chapter includes background information, experimental protocols, and suggested applications. An extensive array of techniques is featured. The authors are experienced researchers who ...

Format:OtherDimensions:646 pages, 1 × 1 × 1 inPublished:February 1, 1992Publisher:Academic PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0080859348

ISBN - 13:9780080859347

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Table of Contents

General Information.<_24_>M. Wu and J. Gerhart,<_24_>RaisingXenopus<_24_>in the Laboratory.J.D. Graf and H.R. Kobel,<_24_>Genetics ofXenopus laevis. R. Tompkins and D. Reinschmidt,<_24_>Experimentally Induced Homozygosity inXenopus laevis. L.D. Smith, W. Xu, and R.L. Varnold,<_24_>Oogenesis and Oocyte Isolation.R. Keller,<_24_>Early Embryonic Development ofXenopus laevis.<_24_>Oocytes.<_24_>L.K. Opresko,<_24_>Vitellogenin Uptake andin Vitro<_24_>Culture of Oocytes.J.P. Evans and B.K. Kay,<_24_>Biochemical Fractionation of Oocytes.J.G. Gall, H.G. Callan, Z. Wu, and C. Murphy,<_24_>Lampbrush Chromosomes.M. Wormington,<_24_>Preparation of Synthetic mRNAs and Analyses of Translational Efficiency of Micro-injectedXenopus<_24_>Oocytes.C. Prives and D. Foukal,<_24_>Use of Oligonucleotides for Antisense Experiments inXenopus laevis<_24_>Oocytes.Embryos.<_24_>J. Heasman, S. Holwill, and C.C. Wylie,<_24_>Fertilization of CulturedXenopus<_24_>Oocytes and Use in Studies of Maternally Inherited Molecules.J.L. Hedrick and D.M. Hardy,<_24_>Isolation of Extracellular Matrix Structures fromXenopus laevis<_24_>Oocytes, Eggs, and Embryos.D.G. Capco and W.M. Bement,<_24_>Analysis of Cellular Signaling Events, the Cytoskeleton, and Spatial Organization of Macromolecules during EarlyXenopus<_24_>Development.K. Kao and M. Danilchik,<_24_>Generation of Body Plan Phenotypes in Early Embryogenesis.R.L. Gimlich,<_24_>Fluorescent Dextran Clonal Markers.J.B. Gurdon,<_24_>Nuclear Transplantation inXenopus. I.B. Dawid,<_24_>Mesoderm Induction.C.R. Phillips,<_24_>Neural Induction.T.D. Sargent and P.H. Mathers,<_24_>Analysis of Class II Gene Regulation.P.D. Vize, A. Hemmati-Brivanlou, R.M. Harland, and D.A. Melton,<_24_>Assays for Gene Function in DevelopingXenopus<_24_>Embryos.G.M. Kelly, D.W. Eib, and R.T. Moon,<_24_>Histological Preparation ofXenopus laevis<_24_>Oocytes and Embryos.M.W. Klymkowsky and J. Hanken,<_24_>Whole-Mount Staining ofXenopus<_24_>and Other Vertebrates.H.P. O'Keefe, D.A. Melton, B. Ferreiro, and C. Kintner, In Situ<_24_>Hyridization.Model Systems Using Oocytes, Eggs, and Embryos.<_24_>D. Carroll and C.W. Lehman,<_24_>DNA Recombination and Repair in Oocytes, Eggs, and Extracts.A.L. Goldin,<_24_>Expression of Ion Channels by Injection of mRNA intoXenopus<_24_>Oocytes.H.B. Peng, L.P. Baker, and Q. Chen,<_24_>Tissue Culture ofXenopus<_24_>Neurons and Muscle Cells as a Model for Studying Synaptic Induction.D.W. DeSimone and K.E. Johnson,<_24_>TheXenopus<_24_>Embryo as a Model System for the Study of Cell-Extracellular Matrix Interactions.A.P. Wolffe and C. Schild,<_24_>Chromatin Assembly.G.H. Leno and R.A. Laskey,<_24_>DNA Replication in Cell-Free Extracts fromXenopus laevis. A.W. Murray,<_24_>Cell Cycle Extracts.D.D. Newmeyer and K.L. Wilson,<_24_>Egg Extracts for Nuclear Import and Nuclear Assembly Reactions.J.C. Smith and J.R. Tata, Xenopus<_24_>Cell Lines.Appendixes<_24_>H.B. Peng,<_24_>Solutions and Protocols.B.K. Kay,<_24_>Injections of Oocytes and Embryos.A. Droin,<_24_>Mutants ofXenopus laevis. J.M. Cherry,<_24_>Codon Usage forXenopus laevis. M. Danilchik, H.B. Peng, and B.K. Kay,<_24_>Pictorial Collage of Embryonic Stages. Xenopus Suppliers in the United States.R.M. Harland, In Situ<_24_>Hyridization: An Improved Whole Mount Method forXenopus<_24_>Embryos. Chapter References. Index. Contents of Recent Volumes.