Xvi

Paperback | January 6, 2011

byJulia Karr

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Nina Oberon's life is pretty normal: she hangs out with her best friend, Sandy, and their crew, goes to school, plays with her little sister, Dee. But Nina is 15. And like all girls she'll receive a Governing Council-ordered tattoo on her 16th birthday. XVI. Those three letters will be branded on her wrist, announcing to all the world-even the most predatory of men-that she is ready for sex. Considered easy prey by some, portrayed by the Media as sluts who ask for attacks, becoming a "sex-teen" is Nina's worst fear. That is, until right before her birthday, when Nina's mom is brutally attacked. With her dying breaths, she reveals to Nina a shocking truth about her past-one that destroys everything Nina thought she knew. Now, alone but for her sister, Nina must try to discover who she really is, all the while staying one step ahead of her mother's killer.

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From the Publisher

Nina Oberon's life is pretty normal: she hangs out with her best friend, Sandy, and their crew, goes to school, plays with her little sister, Dee. But Nina is 15. And like all girls she'll receive a Governing Council-ordered tattoo on her 16th birthday. XVI. Those three letters will be branded on her wrist, announcing to all the world-...

Julia Karr lives in Seymour, Indiana.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:336 pages, 8.24 × 5.52 × 0.87 inPublished:January 6, 2011Publisher:Penguin Young Readers GroupLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0142417718

ISBN - 13:9780142417713

Appropriate for ages: 13 - 17

Customer Reviews of Xvi

Reviews

Rated 1 out of 5 by from It could Have Been Good So I really think this book could have be great, it had a good concept and solid characters but it was executed all wrong. I found that the plot had so many holes in it and it really got to me when things were not explained I wanted to knw why the world had changed so much but it got skipped over. I thought the charaters were pretty good if a bit boring but they came off being realistic which I thought was good. Overall this was not a good book but I needed it for my A-Z challenge an it got the job done. :0)
Date published: 2012-12-22
Rated 1 out of 5 by from "WOW" in a bad way. Weak. This could be something I can write up and man, I cannot write. The obsession with dystopian novels at the moment is causing "authors" to come up with works that they will regret. Some of my favourite dystopias are The GONE series by Michael Grant and The Chaos Walking Series by Patrick Ness.
Date published: 2012-08-07
Rated 2 out of 5 by from A Disappointing Dystopian World Authors are writing new dystopian books left, right and centre. I have been so excited to read as many as I can, and this book was one of the ones I looked forward to. XVI had a creative plot, but I just didn't buy it. I'm not sure if it was the way it was executed or because of the believability of the characters OR if it was both. I just didn't enjoy reading this, and by the time I was half way through I struggled to continue. This book had so much more potential. While I liked the mystery intertwined with the plot, the dystopian world fell flat for me. The author didn't provide enough details about the world for me to feel as though it existed. The writing wasn't great and the characters weren't that special. I never connected with any of them, and I struggled to feel empathy, happiness or sadness in the times that the characters did so. There was a real disconnect between me and the book. Our main character in this book is Nina and we learn that she lives in a futuristic world where teens are called "sexteens." When girl's turn sixteen they are to get a tattoo on their wrist that says 16 in roman numerals, XVI. Nina doesn't want to turn sixteen, she dreads her birthday. She isn't like the other girls. The tattoo is a symbol to men that the girls are at a legal age, and that they can have whoever they want. Nina fears this and struggles to live in a world where the government can see your every move. One thing leads to another and Nina's mother is attacked. Her death causes Nina to question everything she has ever known, and what has been hidden from her. She plummets into a mystery where she has to discover family secrets and protect her little sister. Nina has to solve the mystery her mother left behind, protect the ones she loves and protect herself in the world of XVI. Overall, it was an interesting read but I cannot say that I enjoyed it. The concept was unique, but the execution fell very flat. The romance was a good touch, but not enough to keep this book afloat. I really did wish I liked this more, but sadly I didn't. 2/5 2011-027
Date published: 2011-10-23
Rated 1 out of 5 by from not so sweet XVI I like conspiracy theories, I like dystopian settings, I like books about surviving complicated relationships. I think XVI by Julia Karr tries to push too many of each of these things into one novel. “Nina Oberon’s life is pretty normal: she hangs out with her best friend, Sandy, and their crew, goes to school, plays with her little sister, Dee. But Nina is 15. And like all girls she’ll receive a Governing Council-ordered tattoo on her 16th birthday. XVI. Those three letters will be branded on her wrist, announcing to all the world—even the most predatory of men—that she is ready for sex. Considered easy prey by some, portrayed by the Media as sluts who ask for attacks, becoming a “sex-teen” is Nina’s worst fear. That is, until right before her birthday, when Nina’s mom is brutally attacked. With her dying breaths, she reveals to Nina a shocking truth about her past—one that destroys everything Nina thought she knew. Now, alone but for her sister, Nina must try to discover who she really is, all the while staying one step ahead of her mother’s killer.” The media only tells lies and brainwashes you, there’s human trafficking, objectification of women, a caste system, vaccination scams, corrupt officials….. the world of XVI is a really really really crappy one to live in. I think this is taken a bit too far. There’s dystopian, and then there’s every possible thing gone wrong. There’s a point where it just isn’t a believable world. Especially because it seems that every teen Nina meets is anti-government. If it was so simple to fall in with the rebel crowd there would be a revolution already under way. Another major issue I have with the book is that I don’t understand how Dee can be ignorant of Ed beating Ginnie. Ginnie was in very rough shape pretty often from the sounds of it, and Dee is old enough that she would have noticed, even if she never witnessed the violence herself. Nina seems to feel she is protecting Dee by not telling her about Ed’s abusive relationship with her mother, the time he kidnapped her, or how he hurt her. This is ludicrous! If you want to protect your sister from her father, don’t tell her sweetly not to go anywhere alone with him. If she doesn’t know how evil he is, she will go with him, it’s her dad. Nina fails miserably as a guardian in this respect. Sheltering kids from what’s going on in the world, and especially their homes is no way to protect them. Kids who know about the dangers are the ones who are capable of avoiding them or dealing with them. If you shelter someone completely until they’re an adult, they aren’t prepared to be an adult and experience culture shock. If you tell your kids everyone is good and friendly they may make the mistake of getting in that strange van. Come on, Nina! I thought that Nina had a lot more reason to like Derek then Sal. He was sweet and generous, and a good friend. She falls for Sal like the sex-teens she hates, almost entirely based on appearances. I didn’t feel the chemistry between them, and he gives her a gift that I can’t imagine a guy picking out (maybe a 10-year-old girl?). What I did like: •The contrasting messages teens get from the society about sex is a subject that is worth writing about. Being pushed by advertising and peer pressure to be sexy, but pressured by parents, school and religion to be chaste. •Wei’s tattoo •it makes readers think about how the media influences them •it makes readers question the peer pressure race to have sex •it paid homage to classic books, although I think Brave New World should have been mentioned and I didn’t notice that. Overall I’m afraid I was disappointed. It felt a bit clunky and forced *read on my Kobo
Date published: 2011-03-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fabulous book, scary reality Unlike other girls her age, Nina is not looking forward to turning sixteen, especially the XVI tattoo she is required to get which declares her as legal. Her mother does everything she can to help Nina avoid many of the things expected of her when she turns sixteen. When her mother is murdered, Nina's world is turned upside down and secrets are revealed that put Nina's life in danger. In a word, AMAZING! Julia Karr does a wonderful job of transporting the reader to this possible future reality, without telling us exactly how this new world is. Instead she shows the reader through thoughts, actions and dialogue. The characters are fabulous and believable. There are some behaviors which will never change, no matter what reality we live in. XVI is intense, whether Nina is experiencing her first feelings of lust or running for her life. The pages just kept turning and I didn't want to stop reading. As great as this book is, the reality of the characters' lives is a scary possibility. Not to say this will be our future, but the possibility is there. I recommend XVI to everyone, but I believe it should be required reading for all teenage girls. This is another great dystopian novel from the League of Extraordinary Writers.
Date published: 2011-03-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Dreaming of Books Review (May Contain Spoilers) Unlike most girls, Nina does not relish the thought of turning sixteen also known as “sex-teen”. On their sixteen birthday every girl gets a tattoo on their wrist basically announcing to everyone that they are legal to have sex. As she’s stressing over her upcoming sixteen birthday her mother is mysteriously murdered and she learns that her father who supposedly died when she was a baby might still be alive. Her mother’s admission leads to more secrets as she tries to uncover the truth behind the murder and protect her family. The media portrays being sixteen as very fun, glamorous, liberating and a symbol that the girls are grown up. Nina’s mom has always taught her to think for herself and to question things so Nina’s never bought into the media hype over it. Her best friend Sandy on the other hand is all about “sex-teen”, “XVI Ways” and cannot wait for the day to come. I did find her annoying in that she’s is naïve, has a big mouth, and believes everything that the media tells her…but what happened to her in the end was sad and something I didn’t think she deserved. Nina ends up uncovering a lot about her family that she never knew about. Her mother, when she was still alive had a lot more going on than Nina realized and has done her best to keep Nina in the dark about government secrets and out of danger. I’m not sure if this is a part of a series…I hope it is just because we’re left with an open ending and there’s still a lot of things that are left unresolved. Overall, a intense and powerful dystopian read in the best of ways. Its really a book that stays with you after you’ve read it and makes you step back think of the parallels of society today.
Date published: 2011-02-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing First thing I thought when I saw the book is ‘Damn, it is so inexpensive!’ I’m used to buy new books at 20$, not 11$. I didn’t really know what to expect of this book. I had never heard from it. What a great read, I must say. It is such a captivating book. Set in a dystopia, the story revolves around a fifteen years old girl Nina. For once, I feel like I can identify in a way with the main character. I start reading it yesterday, and I honestly couldn’t put it down. I was completely captivated by it. It is so well written; the characters are amazing, and the plot excellent. You want to know what will happen to Nina. You want to know who is really Sal. You hope Sandy will someday stop being such a naïve girl. I saw in this book a critic of the world, a warning of where we could be going. It is a world where people don’t think. They do what the government tells them to do. They think what the medias tell them to think. They don’t really question anything. Will the world end up like this? I hope this book can make teenagers start questioning what they are told. There is too many that don’t seem to always think for themselves. This book is my favorite for 2011 so far. I would recommend it to anyone whose looking for a good read. For more reviews: abeautifulmadness.blogspot.com
Date published: 2011-02-05