Zen Spirit, Christian Spirit: The Place Of Zen In Christian Life by Robert KennedyZen Spirit, Christian Spirit: The Place Of Zen In Christian Life by Robert Kennedy

Zen Spirit, Christian Spirit: The Place Of Zen In Christian Life

byRobert Kennedy

Paperback | January 6, 1995

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'Kennedy shows other Christians a way of integrating Zen Buddhism and Christian belief. He does this convincingly and gracefully... by weaving together Zen poetry and koans, Western poetry and literature, scriptural texts and personal experience.' National Catholic Reporter
Robert J. Kennedy teaches theology at St. Peter's College, is a psychotherapist in private practice, and conducts Zen retreats at various centers in the United States and Mexico. He is the author of Zen Spirit/Christian Spirit.
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Title:Zen Spirit, Christian Spirit: The Place Of Zen In Christian LifeFormat:PaperbackDimensions:144 pages, 8.97 × 6.04 × 0.45 inPublished:January 6, 1995Publisher:Bloomsbury

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0826409199

ISBN - 13:9780826409195

Reviews

From Our Editors

"Father Kennedy Sensei opens up two rich meditative traditions to savor their wisdom". -- America

"The work of a deeply thoughtful and compassionate man". -- First Things

Editorial Reviews

'This book will be of particular interest to Christians who are both puzzled and intrigued by one who simultaneously professes Christian faith and engages in Zen practice. When Kennedy - a Jesuit, a practicing psychotherapist, and a Zen teacher (sensei) - writes autobiographically, this book is at its best. The book is divided into four sections corresponding to four stages of spiritual life and four stages of alchemy: lead (knowledge), quicksilver (love), sulphur (purification), and gold (union). The diversity of references, from alchemy to Jung to Zen, reflects the eclectic character of the book, which reads like a loosely connected series of homilies with moments of insight but no unitive theory. The reader is best advised to savor the glimpses and experiment with the possibility of seeing through them.'