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Picture Books

$13.42 online

$13.99

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Illus. in full color. A madcap band of dancing, prancing monkeys explain hands, fingers, and thumbs to beginning readers.

The Foot Book

by Seuss

|October 12, 1968

Picture Books

$12.56 online

$12.99

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Beginning readers will love this foot-filled Bright and Early Book classic by Dr. Seuss! From left feet to right feet and wet feet to dry feet, there are so many feet to meet. The Foot Book will have young readers eager to step into the wonderful world of Dr.…

Hardcover

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This delightful book helps adults answer some of the wonderful questions children often ask regarding their bodies, specifically questions about belly buttons.

Scorpions

by Walter Dean Myers

|April 23, 2013

Paperback

$12.50

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Scorpions , a Newbery Honor Book by National Ambassador for Young People's Literature Walter Dean Myers, is celebrating its twenty-fifth anniversary! When it was first published in 1988, Scorpions amazed readers. It continues to do so today. This special…

Sun Up, Sun Down

by Gail Gibbons

|February 1, 2001

Paperback

$10.00

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Simple language and bold illustrations make this a fun and informative book about the sun. 'Add this one to primary-grade science shelves.' - Booklist

The Foot Book

by Seuss

|September 12, 1968

Reinforced Library Binding

$14.99

Out of stock online

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Beginning readers will love this foot-filled Bright and Early Book classic by Dr. Seuss! From left feet to right feet and wet feet to dry feet, there are so many feet to meet. The Foot Book will have young readers eager to step into the wonderful world of Dr.…

Magnetic Magic

by John Cassidy

|November 1, 2003

Hardcover

$14.99

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Nifty magic tricks that rely on the deceptive use of magnets, complete with ten magnets and one magnetizable coin. A seamless blend of Klutz goofballism, MIT physics, and some very sneaky magic.