1867: How The Fathers Made A Deal

Paperback | October 1, 1998

byChristopher Moore

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“In the 1860s, western alienation began at Yonge Street, and George Brown was the Preston Manning of the day.” So begins Christopher Moore’s fascinating 1990s look at the messy, dramatic, crisis-ridden process that brought Canada into being – and at the politicians, no more lovable or united than our own, who, against all odds, managed to forge a deal that worked.

From the first chapter, he turns a fresh, perceptive, and lucid eye on the people, the issues, and the political theories of Confederation – from John A. Macdonald’s canny handling of leadership to the invention of federalism and the Senate, from the Quebec question to the influence of political philosophers Edmund Burke and Walter Bagehot.

This is a book for all Canadians who love their country – and fear for it after the failure of the constitution-making of the 1990s. Here is a clear, entertaining reintroduction to the ideas and processes that forged the nation.


From the Hardcover edition.

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From Our Editors

For Canadians who love their country and who want to know more about its origins, 1867 is a comprehensive book that delves into Canada's history. From the very first chapter, Christopher Moore turns a fresh, perceptive and lucid eye on the people, the issues and the political theories of Confederation. From John A. Macdonald's leadersh...

From the Publisher

“In the 1860s, western alienation began at Yonge Street, and George Brown was the Preston Manning of the day.” So begins Christopher Moore’s fascinating 1990s look at the messy, dramatic, crisis-ridden process that brought Canada into being – and at the politicians, no more lovable or united than our own, who, against all odds, managed...

From the Jacket

"In the 1860s, western alienation began at Yonge Street, and George Brown was the Preston Manning of the day." So begins Christopher Moore's fascinating 1990s look at the messy, dramatic, crisis-ridden process that brought Canada into being - and at the politicians, no more lovable or united than our own, who, against all odds, managed...

Christopher Moore may be Canada’s most versatile writer of history. His first book, Louisbourg Portraits, won a Governor General’s Award and continues to delight readers, and his Loyalists: Revolution, Exile, Settlement won the Secretary of State’s Prize for Excellence in Canadian Studies. He co-authored the authoritative Illustrated H...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:296 pages, 8.98 × 6 × 0.66 inPublished:October 1, 1998Publisher:McClelland & StewartLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0771060963

ISBN - 13:9780771060960

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From Our Editors

For Canadians who love their country and who want to know more about its origins, 1867 is a comprehensive book that delves into Canada's history. From the very first chapter, Christopher Moore turns a fresh, perceptive and lucid eye on the people, the issues and the political theories of Confederation. From John A. Macdonald's leadership to the invention of federalism and the Senate, 1867 is a clear and entertaining introduction to the ideas and processes of this greatest of great nations.

Editorial Reviews

“Delightful, engrossing.”
–Dalton Camp

“I wish I’d had this book in front of me in high school rather than the book I did. Because this is interesting. And it’s actually fun.”
–Michael Enright, This Morning

“An immense contribution to our literature and collective memory.”
–Gordon F. Gibson, columnist, Globe and Mail


From the Hardcover edition.