1920: The Year of the Six Presidents by David Pietrusza1920: The Year of the Six Presidents by David Pietrusza

1920: The Year of the Six Presidents

byDavid Pietrusza

Paperback | April 8, 2008

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The presidential election of 1920 was among history's most dramatic. Six once-and-future presidents-Wilson, Harding, Coolidge, Hoover, and Teddy and Franklin Roosevelt-jockeyed for the White House. With voters choosing between Wilson's League of Nations and Harding's front-porch isolationism, the 1920 election shaped modern America. Women won the vote. Republicans outspent Democrats by 4 to 1, as voters witnessed the first extensive newsreel coverage, modern campaign advertising, and results broadcast on radio. America had become an urban nation: Automobiles, mass production, chain stores, and easy credit transformed the economy. 1920 paints a vivid portrait of America, beset by the Red Scare, jailed dissidents, Prohibition, smoke-filled rooms, bomb-throwing terrorists, and the Klan, gingerly crossing modernity's threshold.
David Pietrusza has written or edited ore than thirty books. His previous book, Rothstein: The Life, Times, and Murder of the Criminal Genius Who Fixed the 1919 World Series, was nominated for the Mystery Writers of America Edgar Award in the Best Fact Crime category. An expert on the 1920s, Pietrusza has served on the Board of Directo...
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Title:1920: The Year of the Six PresidentsFormat:PaperbackDimensions:592 pages, 9.25 × 6.25 × 1.62 inPublished:April 8, 2008Publisher:Basic BooksLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0786721022

ISBN - 13:9780786721023

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Editorial Reviews

"In 1920: The Year of Six Presidents, writer David Pietrusza shows the right way to pull together disparate characters into a coherent narrative...this book portrays an America that has stopped looking backward and has begun to craft a new country and a new world role."-Washington Times