A Jewish Colonel in the Civil War: Marcus M. Spiegel of the Ohio Volunteers by Marcus M. SpiegelA Jewish Colonel in the Civil War: Marcus M. Spiegel of the Ohio Volunteers by Marcus M. Spiegel

A Jewish Colonel in the Civil War: Marcus M. Spiegel of the Ohio Volunteers

byMarcus M. SpiegelEditorJean Powers Soman, Frank L. Byrne

Paperback | May 1, 1995

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Marcus Spiegel, a German Jewish immigrant, served with the 67th and 120th Ohio Volunteer regiments during the Civil War. He saw action in Virginia, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana, where he was fatally wounded in May 1864. These letters to Caroline, his wife, reveal the traumatizing experience of a soldier and the constant concern of a husband and father.
Jean Powers Soman is a great-great-granddaughter of Marcus Spiegel. Her coeditor, Frank L. Byrne, is a professor of history at Kent State University and the editor of several books, including Haskell of Gettysburg: His Life and Civil War Papers.
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Title:A Jewish Colonel in the Civil War: Marcus M. Spiegel of the Ohio VolunteersFormat:PaperbackDimensions:353 pages, 9 × 6.08 × 0.78 inPublished:May 1, 1995Publisher:UNP - Nebraska Paperback

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0803292325

ISBN - 13:9780803292321

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From Our Editors

Marcus M. Spiegel, a German Jewish immigrant, served with the 67th and 120th Ohio Volunteer regiments during the Civil War. He saw action in Virginia, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana, where he was fatally wounded in May 1864. These letters to Caroline, his wife, reveal the traumatizing experience of a soldier and the constant concern of a husband and father.

Editorial Reviews

“A wonderfully vivid and detailed picture of military life . . . one virtually hears the Colonel’s voice. One also comes to see this proud, enthusiastic, not impractical idealist as a friend, whose death, when his luck finally runs out, causes real grief.”—Atlantic Monthly
- Atlantic Monthly