A Most Holy War: The Albigensian Crusade and the Battle for Christendom by Mark Gregory PeggA Most Holy War: The Albigensian Crusade and the Battle for Christendom by Mark Gregory Pegg

A Most Holy War: The Albigensian Crusade and the Battle for Christendom

byMark Gregory Pegg

Paperback | November 15, 2009

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The Albigensian Crusade, the first in which Christians were promised salvation for killing other Christians, lasted twenty bloody years - a long savage war for the soul of Christendom. In A Most Holy War, historian Mark Pegg has produced a swift-moving, gripping narrative of this horrificcrusade. Pegg draws in part on thousands of testimonies collected by inquisitors in the years 1235 to 1245, accounts of ordinary men and women remembering what it was like to live through such brutal times. In responding to heresy with a holy genocidal war, Innocent III fundamentally changed howWestern civilization dealt with individuals accused of corrupting society. This change, Pegg argues, led directly to the creation of the inquisition, the rise of an anti-Semitism, and even the holy violence of the Reconquista in Spain.
Mark Pegg is Associate Professor of History at Washington University in St. Louis.
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Title:A Most Holy War: The Albigensian Crusade and the Battle for ChristendomFormat:PaperbackDimensions:288 pages, 8.9 × 5.7 × 0.7 inPublished:November 15, 2009Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195393104

ISBN - 13:9780195393101

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Table of Contents

PrefaceAcknowledgmentsDramatis PersonaeGenealogical ChartsA Most Holy WarAbbreviations Used in NotesNotesBibliographyIndex

Editorial Reviews

"A bold, erudite, engaging, and superbly written study of what has long been one of the most central topics in medieval and Mediterranean history." --Teofilo F. Ruiz, Professor of History, UCLA