Canuck Rock: A History of Canadian Popular Music by Ryan EdwardsonCanuck Rock: A History of Canadian Popular Music by Ryan Edwardson

Canuck Rock: A History of Canadian Popular Music

byRyan Edwardson

Paperback | September 5, 2009

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The Guess Who. Gordon Lightfoot. Joni Mitchell. Neil Young. Stompin' Tom Connors. Robert Charlebois. Anne Murray. Crowbar. Chilliwack. Carole Pope. Loverboy. Bryan Adams. The Barenaked Ladies. The Tragically Hip. Céline Dion. Arcade Fire. K-oS. Feist. These musicians are national heroes to generations of Canadians. But what does it mean to be a Canadian musician? And why does nationality even matter? Canuck Rock addresses these questions by delving into the myriad relationships between the people who make music, the industries that produce and sell it, the radio stations and government legislation that determine availability, and the fans who consume it and make it their own.

An invaluable resource and an absorbing read, Canuck Rock spans from the emergence of rock and roll in the 1950s through to today's international recording industry. Combining archival material, published accounts, and new interviews, Ryan Edwardson explores how music in Canada became Canadian music.

Ryan Edwardson is a Canadian music fan with a PhD in History from Queen's University.
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Title:Canuck Rock: A History of Canadian Popular MusicFormat:PaperbackDimensions:432 pages, 9 × 6.02 × 0.9 inPublished:September 5, 2009Publisher:University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing DivisionLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0802097154

ISBN - 13:9780802097156

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Table of Contents

Introduction - Canadian Music and the Unruly Question of National Identity

Lonely Boys and Wild Girls: Rock and Roll in Canada in the 1950s

Guess Who?: Beatlemania and the Race to be British, 1963-66

From 'Tom Dooley' to 'Mon Pays': Commercialism and Nationalization in Folk Music

Caliornia Dreamin': Why Canadian Musicians were not 'Helpless' in the United States, 1965-70

Turn on, Tun in, and Drop Out': Psychedelic Music and How a Band from the Pairies was Saved by its Wheatfield Soul, 1966-70

Legislated Radio': Industry, Identity, and the Push for Canadian Content, 1965-71

Oh What a Feeling': Canadian Content and Identity Politics in the 1970s

And the Juno Goes To...': Television and the Selling of 'Canadian' Music

Takin' Care of Business': The Multinational Underwriting of the Canadian Music Industry, 1970-2006

Everything I Do (I Do It For Me)': Bryan Adams and the Waking Up the Neightbours Controversy

Conclusion - From 'Music in Canada' to 'Canadian Music'

Bibliography

Editorial Reviews

The Guess Who. Gordon Lightfoot. Joni Mitchell. Neil Young. Stompin' Tom Connors. Robert Charlebois. Anne Murray. Crowbar. Chilliwack. Carole Pope. Loverboy. Bryan Adams. The Barenaked Ladies. The Tragically Hip. Céline Dion. Arcade Fire. K-oS. Feist. These musicians are national heroes to generations of Canadians. But what does it mean to be a Canadian musician? And why does nationality even matter? Canuck Rock addresses these questions by delving into the myriad relationships between the people who make music, the industries that produce and sell it, the radio stations and government legislation that determine availability, and the fans who consume it and make it their own. An invaluable resource and an absorbing read, Canuck Rock spans from the emergence of rock and roll in the 1950s through to today's international recording industry. Combining archival material, published accounts, and new interviews, Ryan Edwardson explores how music in Canada became Canadian music.'Canuck Rock is an impressive and important book. Ryan Edwardson takes obvious delight in exploring the minutiae of Canadian pop music and gives every indication of being a fan as well as an historian. Aficionados of Canadian pop music will take great pleasure in the literally hundreds of fascinating details of the "music biz" the author has unearthed.' - Robert Wright, Department of History, Trent University