Confronting Memories of World War II: European and Asian Legacies by Daniel Chirot

Confronting Memories of World War II: European and Asian Legacies

EditorDaniel Chirot, Gi-wook Shin, Daniel Sneider

Paperback | February 21, 2014

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The legacy of the Second World War has been, like the war itself, an international phenomenon. In both Europe and Asia, common questions of criminality, guilt, and collaboration have intersected with history and politics on the local level to shape the way that wartime experience has been memorialized, reinterpreted, and used.

By directly comparing European and Asian legacies, Confronting Memories of World War II, provides unique insight into the way that World War II continues to influence contemporary attitudes and politics on a global scale. The collection brings together experts from a variety of disciplines and perspectives to explore the often overlooked commonalities between European and Asian handling of memories and reflections about guilt. These commonalities suggest new understandings of the war's legacy and the continuing impact of historical trauma.

About The Author

Daniel Chirot is Herbert J. Ellison Professor of Russian and Eurasian Studies at the University of Washington. Gi-Wook Shin is director of the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center at Stanford University, as well as holder of the Tong Yang, Korea Foundation, and Korea Stanford Alumni Chair of Korean Studies. Daniel Sneider...
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Confronting Memories of World War II: European and Asian Legacies
Confronting Memories of World War II: European and Asian Legacies

by Daniel Chirot

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Title:Confronting Memories of World War II: European and Asian LegaciesFormat:PaperbackDimensions:340 pages, 9.02 × 6.01 × 0.85 inPublished:February 21, 2014Publisher:University Of Washington PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0295993464

ISBN - 13:9780295993461

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Table of Contents

AcknowledgmentsIntroduction

1. Admitting Guilt is Neither Common Nor Easy2. Interrupted Memories3. Different Strokes4. Divided Memories of World War II in the Netherlands and the Dutch East Indies5. France and the Memory of Occupation6. Historical Reconciliation in the Northeast Asia7. Israelis and Germany after the Second World War8. Historical Memories and International Relations in Northeast Asia9. Divisive Historical Memories10. Guilt, Shame, Balts, Jews

BibliographyContributorsIndex

Editorial Reviews

The legacy of the Second World War has been, like the war itself, an international phenomenon. In both Europe and Asia, common questions of criminality, guilt, and collaboration have intersected with history and politics on the local level to shape the way that wartime experience has been memorialized, reinterpreted, and used.By directly comparing European and Asian legacies, Confronting Memories of World War II, provides unique insight into the way that World War II continues to influence contemporary attitudes and politics on a global scale. The collection brings together experts from a variety of disciplines and perspectives to explore the often overlooked commonalities between European and Asian handling of memories and reflections about guilt. These commonalities suggest new understandings of the war's legacy and the continuing impact of historical trauma.This truly 'international' edited volume on the issues of war, memory, and national identity explores how memories about wartime experiences?including criminality, collaboration and reconciliation?are shaped and reshaped, connected to questions of national identity, and used for domestic and international political purposes. - Patricia L. Maclachlan, University of Texas, Austin