Kill The Messengers by Mark BourrieKill The Messengers by Mark Bourrie

Kill The Messengers

byMark Bourrie

Paperback | August 18, 2015

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Ottawa has become a place where the nation’s business is done in secret, and access to information—the lifeblood of democracy in Canada—is under attack.

It’s being lost to an army of lobbyists and public-relations flacks who help set the political agenda and decide what you get to know. It’s losing its struggle against a prime minister and a government that continue to delegitimize the media’s role in the political system. The public’s right to know has been undermined by a government that effectively killed Statistics Canada, fired hundreds of scientists and statisticians, gutted Library and Archives Canada and turned freedom of information rules into a joke. Facts, it would seem, are no longer important.

In Kill the Messengers: Stephen Harper's Assault on Your Right to Know, Mark Bourrie exposes how trends have conspired to simultaneously silence the Canadian media and elect an anti-intellectual government determined to conduct business in private. Drawing evidence from multiple cases and examples, Bourrie demonstrates how budget cuts have been used to suppress the collection of facts that embarrass the government’s position or undermine its ideologically based decision-making. Perhaps most importantly, Bourrie gives advice on how to take back your right to be informed and to be heard.

Kill the Messengers is not just a collection of evidence bemoaning the current state of the Canadian media, it is a call to arms for informed citizens to become active participants in the democratic process. It is a book all Canadians are entitled to read—and now, they’ll get the chance.

This paperback edition of the national bestseller has been updated and features a new chapter on the Canadian Anti-Terrorism Bill.

MARK BOURRIEholds a PhD in Canadian media and military history; he is a National Magazine Award–winning journalist and has been a member of the Canadian Parliamentary Press Gallery since 1994. He has written hundreds of freelance pieces for most of the country’s major magazines and newspapers, which have resulted in several awards and ...
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Title:Kill The MessengersFormat:PaperbackDimensions:416 pages, 9 × 6 × 1.04 inPublished:August 18, 2015Publisher:HarperCollinsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1443431052

ISBN - 13:9781443431057

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Customer Reviews of Kill The Messengers

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Rated 3 out of 5 by from Better than Party Of One Mark Bourrie has a unified theme here: the decline of democratic institutions. And he keeps coming back to it enough to hold the thing together. Though for many middle chapters, it's more so in passing while he recounts some Harper government's favourites. The long-form census. Officers of Parliament. Advertising. But the whole book is redeemed by the superb opening chapters on the self-evisceration of Canadian media stretching back many decades, and acknowledgment of Harper's place in a long evolution of Canadian Prime Ministers and politicians. Yes, Harper is the latest, meanest, control-freakiest mini-autocrat in a string of them, but there have been a string of them. Trudeau openly detested the press. And Chretien was a gutter-fighting petit gars. Nor was there a golden-age of media. And it's unlikely any modern party and leader will form a fully open, transparent, accountably government. The temptations of the levers of power are just too great. It's up to citizens.
Date published: 2015-01-21