Logic: The Question Of Truth by Martin HeideggerLogic: The Question Of Truth by Martin Heidegger

Logic: The Question Of Truth

byMartin HeideggerTranslated byThomas Sheehan

Paperback | July 5, 2016

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Martin Heidegger's 1925-26 lectures on truth and time provided much of the basis for his momentous work, Being and Time. Not published until 1976 as volume 21 of the Complete Works, three months before Heidegger's death, this work is central to Heidegger's overall project of reinterpreting Western thought in terms of time and truth. The text shows the degree to which Aristotle underlies Heidegger's hermeneutical theory of meaning. It also contains Heidegger's first published critique of Husserl and takes major steps toward establishing the temporal bases of logic and truth. Thomas Sheehan's elegant and insightful translation offers English-speaking readers access to this fundamental text for the first time.

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Thomas Sheehan is Professor of Religious Studies at Stanford University.
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Title:Logic: The Question Of TruthFormat:PaperbackDimensions:376 pages, 9.25 × 6.12 × 1.12 inPublished:July 5, 2016Publisher:Indiana University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0253021650

ISBN - 13:9780253021656

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"Thomas Sheehan has here set the standard of excellence against which all future translations of Heidegger into English must be measured. At long last, the English-speaking reader is spared the unnecessary mystification of the word Dasein. Only Existenz is left untranslated. In his lectures on Holderlin's poem 'Der Ister,' read in the summer of 1942, Heidegger said to his students: 'Tell me what you think about translating and I will tell you who you are.' Professor Sheehan shows us who he is by making accessible the way of thinking of the Heidegger of Sein und Zeit." -Review of Metaphysics