New Critical Essays On James Agee And Walker Evans: Perspectives on Let Us Now Praise Famous Men

Hardcover | September 10, 2010

EditorC. BlinderbyCaroline Blinder

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This timely reappraisal of Walker Evans and James Agee’s photo-textual collaboration Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, 1941 focuses on the interdisciplinary aspects of the book. It provides in-depth chapters on the book’s status as part imaginative fiction, documentary effort, ethnographic study, confessional writing, and modernist prose. Contributions range from chapters on Walker Evan’s photographs and their seminal role in representing the South, material on the journalistic and sociological context for Agee and Evans’s collaboration, their personal relationship and more. Taking into account such concepts as psychoanalysis, photography, cinema, ethnography, semiotics, journalism and the South, among other things, these essays constitute a long overdue and important endeavor within American Studies.

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This timely reappraisal of Walker Evans and James Agee’s photo-textual collaboration Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, 1941 focuses on the interdisciplinary aspects of the book. It provides in-depth chapters on the book’s status as part imaginative fiction, documentary effort, ethnographic study, confessional writing, and modernist prose. ...

Caroline Blinder is in the American Literature Deptment at Goldsmiths, University of London. She is the author of A Self-Made Surrealist: Ideology and Aesthetics in the Work of Henry Miller and has written on the intersections between photography and literature in the work of Walker Evans, Robert Frank, Brassaï, Wright Morris, Weegee,...
Format:HardcoverDimensions:204 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.02 inPublished:September 10, 2010Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan USLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230102921

ISBN - 13:9780230102927

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Table of Contents

Ontological Aspects of Let Us Now Praise Famous Men: Death, Irony, Faulkner--Mick Gidley * On the Porch and in the Room: Threshold Moments and Other Ethnographic Tropes in Let Us Now Praise Famous Men--John Dorst * Walker Evans’s Fictions of the South--Alan Trachtenberg * The Tyranny of Words in the Economy of Abundance: Modernism, Language, and Politics in Let Us Now Praise Famous Men--Sue Currell * Agee, Evans, and the Therapeutic Document: Narrative Neurosis in the Function of Art--Paul Hansom * Two Prickes: The Colon as Practice--Paula Rabinowitz * Animating the Gudgers: On the Problems of a Cinematic Aesthetic in Let Us Now Praise Famous Men--Caroline Blinder                     

Editorial Reviews

“One early reviewer of Let Us Now Praise Famous Men described it as ‘a book that refuses to call itself a book,’ while another in similar spirit compared it to the unclassifiable textual monster that is Melville’s Moby-Dick. Blinder’s collection of consistently lively and illuminating essays does full justice to the haunting complexity of Agee and Evans’s classic volume, issuing an irresistible invitation to revisit this unique mix of hot prose and cool photography.”—Peter Nicholls, Professor of English, New York University“Let Us Now Praise Famous Men may be understood as the most interstial of works: awkwardly poised, as it is, between photography and text; high art and journalism; lament and rebuke; religion and sociology; language and its failure; porch and cotton field . . . New Critical Essays on James Agee and Walker Evans gathers together the very considerable insights of cultural historians, literary and visual scholars, film experts, psychoanalytically persuaded critics and ethnographic readers. As such, read whole and with an eye to its own generative and apt interstices, the collection constitutes the best available guide to Evans and Agee's ongoing arguments.”—Richard Godden, Professor of English, University of California-Irvine