Particle Physics: A Very Short Introduction: A Very Short Introduction by Frank Close

Particle Physics: A Very Short Introduction: A Very Short Introduction

byFrank Close

Paperback | June 14, 2004

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In this compelling introduction to the fundamental particles that make up the universe, Frank Close takes us on a journey into the atom to examine known particles such as quarks, electrons, and the ghostly neutrino. Along the way he provides fascinating insights into how discoveries inparticle physics have actually been made, and discusses how our picture of the world has been radically revised in the light of these developments. He concludes by looking ahead to new ideas about the mystery of antimatter, the number of dimensions that there might be in the universe, and to whatthe next 50 years of research might reveal.

About The Author

Frank Close is Professor of Physics at Oxford University and a Fellow of Exeter College. He was formerly the Head of the Theoretical Physics Division at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, and Head of Communications and Public Education at CERN. He is the author of several books, including the best-selling Lucifer's Legacy (OUP, 2000)...

Details & Specs

Title:Particle Physics: A Very Short Introduction: A Very Short IntroductionFormat:PaperbackDimensions:160 pages, 6.85 × 4.37 × 0.18 inPublished:June 14, 2004Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0192804340

ISBN - 13:9780192804341

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Table of Contents

1. Journey to the centre of the universe2. How big and small are big and small3. How we learn what things are made of and what we found4. The heart of the matter5. Accelerators: cosmic and man-made6. Detectors: cameras and time machines7. The forces of nature8. Exotic matter (and antimatter)9. Where has matter come from?10. Questions for the 21st Century